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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 2, June 1975
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 2, June 1975 - Image 1. June 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1276/show/1268.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1975). The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 2, June 1975 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1276/show/1268

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 2, June 1975 - Image 1, June 1975, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1276/show/1268.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 2, June 1975
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXV, No. 2, June 1975
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 22
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9860
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f022_006_001.jpg
Transcript <*saK? , Volume XXV, No. 2 June 1975 PUBLISHED BY THE ORNITHOLOGY GROUP, OUTDOQP MATURE CLUB, HOUSTOH, TEXAS A MORNING ON THE SV.'EETLEAF TRAIL "An Island of quiet In a busy world". That was said nearly 5 years ago by a Chronicle reporter In an article about the Sweetleaf Nature Trail In Jones State Forest, and the other day It seemed even more true. Sunday morning, June 1st, being so delightfully cool and clear, with virtually no wind or clouds, seemed a good time to return to the Trail for the first time In several years. Aj?-.^ Just before arriving at the trail parking lot we came upon a flock of Indigo Buntings in the trees and bushes along the roadside. Also, seen on the way Into the parking lot were two Parula Warblers and a Roadrunner. Over the parking lot could be seen an immature Cooper's Hawk wheeling in the clear blue sky overhead. Some of his tall feathers and one or two primary wing feathers were missing. Streaky, barred breast and almost clear belly was observed. After watching this hawk wheel above us for a minute or two, he started making a straight flight away from us and was about to pass from our view when another hawk (sp?) dived on him in a very swift "stoop" and they passed out of our sight down behind the trees. Leaving the hawks to their devices, we began to hear many birds singing as we entered the Trail itself. A close-by twittering call attracted our attention and in the tree just above us a Brown-headed Nuthatch was busily feeding and singing along the branches. Heard singing, too, were Eastern Pewee, Cardinal and White-eyed Vireos. Other "voices" heard deeper in the woods were Pine Warblers, Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Caro- IIna Chickadees and Tufted Titmouse, all of which were later seen except the White- eyed Vireos, who were very difficult to see in the lush forest growth we were going through, and who calls are so distinctive that we didn't make a real attempt to see them. One very interesting sound we began to hear at one point on the trail was a sort of Carolina Wren song, but to both of us it had a different cadence and tone. After much standing, peeking, peering and moving stealthily about, Margaret spotted the producer of this delightful song - a Kentucky Warbler - In beautiful plumage! We think a territory was being proclaimed and a mate being Invited ft* share it. About an hour later as we came back along the trail, after going to the far end, this little warbler was still proclaiming that this was his area.' Shortly after this, our attention was caught by a quiet tapping, which had to be coming from a small woodpecker. Then we started hearing short calls, like "squeals" or "squeaks" (Paul says squeals, I say squeak!), and following the sounds a few yards off the trail, we found, on a large loblolly pine, a Red-cockaded Woodpecker working his way up the tree trunk and pecking Into the bark. While observing this bird, some more "squeals" were heard nearby, and by moving a few yards further Into the brush, two more of the Red-cockaded woodpeckers were seen, on one of which the small red "cockade" was visible. We were especially delighted to find these unusual birds apparently feeding in the trees in the trail area. They are known to inhabit and nest In Jones Forest, but are usually seen in some loblolly pine trees about a mile from the trail area. We later drove to the marked nesting trees and could hear the calls but did not see the birds. Other calIs heard as we moved along the Tra!I were of the Pileated Woodpecker, Common Crow, Blue Jay and Yellow-blI led Cuckoo. Overhead were seen Turkey Vulture, and Black Vulture, and Purple Martins. One Bay-breasted Warbler was sighted, probably our last for this spring. eirtrffci In addition to the birds we were so pleased to see, hear and"enjoy, we saw many damsel flies with their beautiful electric blue bodies and black gauze wings. Other dragon files were seen, especially some with a startling bright green body and ecru wings.