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The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 5, May 1994
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 5, May 1994 - Image 3. May 1994. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1240/show/1236.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1994). The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 5, May 1994 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1240/show/1236

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 5, May 1994 - Image 3, May 1994, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1240/show/1236.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 5, May 1994
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1994
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9879
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f015_005_003.jpg
Transcript Our group did have a large number of cars, but did not fail "...to car pool". Our trip was designed such that people who were not up to a rigorous full day of birding or who desired to participate in the botany portion of this trip could leave when necessary. Everyone who could reasonably car pool did so. Can small organizations such as Houston Audubon or the OG afford the expense and liability of hiring a van and a driver (to eliminate a member-driver's personal liability) for these trips? Singling out our group as a "circus" is blatantly absurd — any extremely unusual bird sighting which attracts large numbers of birders produces such an atmosphere and several large commercial tour groups were also in the Bentsen-Rio Grande State park at the same time as the HAS-OG field trip, as were dozens of other birders. Although the HAS-OG field trip had a large number of participants and we did fail to see the Collared Forest-Falcon which had been first seen three weeks prior to our arrival (and which was not the goal of our trip) and had not been well seen for a week, the apparent insinuation that our field trip caused the bird's disappearance is unfair and does a great disservice to the many fine people who birded with me on this trip. Dwight E. Peake AT A TIME WHEN CONCRETE AND CROPLAND ARE REPLACING WILDLIFE HABITAT ACROSS TEXAS, state biologists are trying to work with the forces of civilization by encouraging urbanites to turn business locations and backyards into wildlife havens. Texas Wildscapes emphasizes providing the basics for good habitat: food, water and shelter. The program is gearing up to send how-to information packets to statewide participants, who then can be "certified" as official wildlife habitat providers. "Since we emphasize reducing lawnsize and planting native species, it not only provides habitat, it's less expensive and easier to maintain," said Matt Wagner of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. "Many native plants are hardy and drought-resistant, so they need little or no water and care. Less lawn means less mowing, plus the joy of seeing wildlife at your back door." Wildscapes is one of the first major projects of the department's recently expanded nongame and urban program. In 1993, the agency hired urban wildlife biologists for major metropolitan areas. [Houston's urban biologist, Chuck Kowaleski, is headquartered at Sheldon Lake State Park, 456-9350.] The move reflects an awareness that 82% of all Texans now live in nine metropolitan areas. "We're going where the people are," Wagner said. "When you see a hummingbird drink from a feeder you hung, or a colorful songbird feed in a fruit tree you planted, these are exciting wildlife experiences. People learn a direct connection between personal action and the benefits of conservation." Wagner envisions individual wildscapes as small habitats that will sustain butterflies and other insects, songbirds, reptiles, small mammals and other species. They can be as simple as feeders, birdbaths and nest boxes for birds, or as complex as elaborate landscaping projects of restored native plants. The goal is to provide places for wild creatures to feed, drink, hide from predators and raise young. For a $15 fee, the department will send an information packet on general backyard wildlife, bird feedes, nest boxes, plantings to attract birds and landscaping with native plants. There is an application form in the packet used to assess the wildlife value of the finished wildscape. The certification fee not only pays for the program, it goes to support nongame education, management and research throughout Texas. Along with the certification process, the department is developing wildscape demonstration sites in major metropolitan areas that will allow the public to observe firsthand what it takes to create wildlife habitat. To receive a Texas Wildscapes information packet, .send a $15 check or money order made out to Texas Wildscapes, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, Texas, 78744. THE 6TH ANNUAL HUMMER/BIRD CELEBRATION IN ROCKPORT/FULTON will be held September 8-11, 1994. To obtain more information call the Rockport/Fulton Area Chamber of Commerce 1-800-242- 0071 or 1-512-729-6445. Young people are encouraged to participate in this exciting event. Admission to programs is free to all persons under age 16. APRIL 16 OG FIELD TRIP GALVKTONlSLAND :This year's first OG RSVP field trip led by Ted Eubanks began promptly at 7:00 a.m. at Offats Bayou in Galveston. The first stop at Kempner Park produced good numbers of Indigo Buntings and Scarlet and Summer Tanagers. A local cat demonstrated how these felines are able to eat 300 birds per year as the group watched it pounce on a Hooded Warbler we had been watching. A Chestnut-sided Warbler flaunted its brilliant plumage for everyone tosee and delighted me with its full "Miss Beacher" song. We then made a brief stop at Galveston Island State park to pick up checklists; Ted encourages birders to get these checklists so that he can revise the list when the current supply is exhausted. With a strong north wind in the morning, Ted predicted that migrating passerines would be forced down in the late afternoon so we headed to San Luis pass for shorebirding. An exhausted Common Yellowthroat came in from the Gulf and literally dropped to the ground on the dunes. The weather was more favorable to the Northern Gannets and jaegers (probably Pomarine) which we saw gliding over the waves. Although San Luis seems to be ignored by most local birders, it has the same shorebird species and comparable numbers to the more frequently birded Bolivar Flats. We quickly tallied 4 species of Peep, including an immaculate Baird's Sandpiper and 6 species of plover (we later saw a Killdeer to complete our sweep of