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The Spoonbill, May 2001
Image 5
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The Spoonbill, May 2001 - Image 5. May 2001. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 11, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1220/show/1216.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 2001). The Spoonbill, May 2001 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1220/show/1216

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, May 2001 - Image 5, May 2001, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 11, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1220/show/1216.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, May 2001
Contributor (Local)
  • Haddican, Mary Pat
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 2001
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9886
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f005_005_005.jpg
Transcript has the largest bill of all. It has twice the length and thickness of the bills of other tanagers. Western Tanager has more orange in the bill than is seen in the Scarlet Tanager. Look for wing-bars. The orioles and the Western Tanagers have wing-bars, the Summer and Scarlet Tanagers do not. Color on the female tanagers can be difficult until you deal with both color and the pattern of that color. The Scarlet Tanager is uniformly greenish yellow from the crown to the rump. The Western Tanager has a gray or dusky back that contrasts with the yellow-green nape and rump. The Scarlet Tanager has a bright under tail covert area. Orangish yellow in the eastern race (this is seen most on the UTC) and greenish yellow in the more western bird Since the Scarlet Tanager is an eastern bird, differentiating between them and Summer Tanagers can usually be accomplished by noting the overall greenish-yellow in the Scarlet Tanager and orangish-yellow in the Summer. Color and pattern on oriole females can help greatly in identifying them. Orchard Oriole females are yellow while Bullock's and Baltimore are light orange. Orchard Orioles are also solidly colored underneath from the throat to the under tail coverts. (Remember that the 1st year male is yellow with a black throat). As with Orchard Orioles, the 1st year male Bullock's Oriole has a black throat but also, a clear black eyeline. Adult male Bullock's and Baltimore, 1" year Bullock's and adult female Baltimore should not be difficult to identify. Youthful birds and the adult Bullock's female can be difficult. The adult female Bullock's Oriole may be brighter yellow on the sides ofthe breast, neck, and face, while young Baltimore Orioles are brighter yellow on the breast with a drab brown on the sides ofthe neck and face. There may be enough individual differences in these characteristics that you will decide to just "see who she is hanging around with". Don is a regular writer and lecturer about birds and teaches a beginning birding field course in conjunction with the Houston Audubon Society. Contact him at (281) 997-0485 or cdplace@concentric.net Webcam Update Happy Mother's Day, Mariah! M. P. Haddican The bald eagle nest in Massachusetts was abandoned by the adult birds after the death of the chick and infertility of two eggs. The commentary on the site speculates that the unusually late winter (we saw a number of days with the brooding eagle surrounded by snow) contributed to the failure ofthe nest. To follow an active eagle nest, check www. wa.gov/wdfwMewing/wildcam/eaglecam or httoJI home.gci.net/~bluffcam. There was much better news from the falcon nest— on May 6, all four of Mariah's eggs hatched, and she and Cabot, the male adult, have been busy caring for the eyases (baby falcons) ever since. The amount of food hunted by the adults (watch out Rochester pigeons!) for themselves and the little ones is incredible. Watch the site for an announcement of banding day, when each Utile eyas will be removed from the nest for a few moments for band- ing and gender determination. www.kodak.com/US/en/ corp/features/birdcam2001/index4.shtml There are a number of other falcon webcams, each with a unique story of beautiful creatures beating the odds, but two are particularly fascinating: In Prague, a pair of adults laid four eggs in a church tower nest box. Three of the eggs broke prematurely (a possible warning of environmental crisis), but one egg successfully hatched Scientists then placed a falcon baby from a breeding program into the nest, and both chicks are thriving www-ext.rnzhla.<;.-z/sokoli/ english/# And in Canada, two female falcons are apparently tending a nest of baby falcons after the male of the original pair lost a territorial battle with the second female. www.peregrine-foundation.ca/Web-Cams/ Hamilton/index.htm