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The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 10, October 1994
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 10, October 1994 - Image 6. October 1994. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/115/show/110.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1994). The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 10, October 1994 - Image 6. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/115/show/110

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 10, October 1994 - Image 6, October 1994, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/115/show/110.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 10, October 1994
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1994
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9879
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f015_009_006.jpg
Transcript 00?" I Goofed! First, let me tell you that I tend to be conservative when I am estimating bird numbers. I tell you this to prepare you for what follows. September 23 dawned clear and cold on the Hawk Watch platform at Smith Point. The first strong cold front of the season had gone through the evening before and I was psyched. I arrived before the sun was up expecting lots of early hawks. Sharp-shins are usually up at dawn and 20 to 30 fly over the platform before 8:00 a.m. I was dismayed when 8:00 a.m. rolled around and I had only seen 18,«J,really wanted BIG numbers. Around 7:30 the first Broad-winged Hawk of the day showed up. This one was a real "early bird" as Broad- wings never show up before 8:00 a.m. At 8:15 a.m., eight more Broad-wings soared over and started circling. At 8:45 they were joined by 150 more. "Hey," I thought, "this isn't going to be such a bad day after all." Then a kettle of 800 moved in, then one thousand more. At 9:00 a.m. there were 2000 Broad-winged Hawks swirling in a kettle over our heads. By 9:15, the numbers were up to five thousand in one huge kettle. What a fantastic sight. Fifteen hawk watch participants watched in awe. The kettle gradually moved to the northwest. At 9:30 another huge kettle of 4-5000 formed to the southeast. Kettle One had gotten very high and hard to see and it seemed to disappear. Then there was another huge kettle in the southeast and Kettle Two was swirling over our heads. I figured the large kettle to tite southeast was Kettle One and that the hawks had streamed to the southeast when we weren't looking. Usually kettles of Broad-wings on Smith Point go back and forth for quite a while, gaining altitude trying to decide what to do. Sometimes the hawks go back up the Point and around the north end of Galveston Bay,but if the conditions are just right, they fly across the bay. All that morning we had 5-10,000 hawks over us. The kettles moved back and forth. They seemed to disappear to the northwest and then suddenly reappear to the southeast. I was amazed that they would waste so much time going back and forth. Sometimes there were other birds in the kettles. A few Anhingas and several Wood Storks were in a kettle later in the morning. We saw very few other species of hawks in the kettles...only two Red-tailed Hawks, one White-tailed Hawk and 40 accipiters. This was definitely a Broad-winged show. That morning I was supposed to be communicating with Frank Peace, our area's "high tech" hawk watcher. He has been tracking the hawk migration on the new weather radar in League City. Most mornings we compare what he is seeing with what I am seeing, but this day— of course, it had to be this day, I forgot to bring bis cellular phone number. As soon as I got home that evening, I called Frank. "Wow, Frank! All morning we had a couple of huge kettles over us. Could you see them? There were at least 10,000 birds." "You didn't have a couple of huge kettles," he informed me. "You had lots of huge kettles." On the radar Frank had seen kettles moving down Smith Point and crossing Galveston Bay. When I had seen them disappear to the northwest, they hadn't circled back to the southeast as I assumed. They really had disappeared. It was hard to comprehend that there were so many hawks. When I asked Frank how many hawks he thought crossed Smith Point, he said, "100,000." That was the number I spread around that evening. I called several people who had been there that morning and explained my mistake and told them how many birds we really saw. They were just as impressed as I was. I even called the Rare Bird Tape and reported that 100,000 hawks had been seen at the Hawk Watch that morning. It wasn't until several days later that I found out that Frank meant 100,000 birds for the whole day. We stopped watching at noon. When we compared Frank's many pictures of the radar screen taken that day with what we had seen at the Hawk Watch, it appeared we had only seen 50,000 Broad-wings that morning. I apologize for spreading erroneous information. Remember, I am the one who said I tend to be conservative about estimating numbers of birds. Now-it you are impressed with the thought of 100,000 hawks going down Smith Point, come to Frank Peace's talk in March and find out exactly what happened north of Galveston Bay on September 23rd! Winnie Burkett The Spoonbill, October 1994 Page 6