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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1925
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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1925 - Image 3. October 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1146/show/1144.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1925). The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1925 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1146/show/1144

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1925 - Image 3, October 1925, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1146/show/1144.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9623
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f028_010_003.jpg
Transcript !•» The Zephyr Page #3 Autumn, Rain, rain, rainl The last vestige of the drought has disappeared, and the thirsty earth is drinking its fill, to the accompaniment of rumbling thunder. There's music in the sweep of the liquid sheets and in the patter of raindrops - a magic strain that stirs the pulse of Nature and brings the flush of life to her cheeks-. All vegetation is refreshed, and the trees look gay again as they begin to shower down their leafy confetti. Fall flowers brighten the fields and roadsides: swaying wands of goldenrod; asters, yellow and purple and white; violet wood- sorrel, mistflowers and ruelllas; pink gerardias and dragonheads; and, queen of Nature's autumn garden, the glorious cardinal lobelia. But this is the season of fruits, and there are evidences of the fact on every hand, despite the harmful effects of the long dry spell. The pokeberries and Spanish mulberries are full and purple now, and the berries of the holly and yupons are starting to turn red. Most attractive Is the Southern bittersweet, with its brilliant seeds clinging to the equally beautiful husks. You may admire at close range the luxuriant clusters of the sarsaparilla, the stretchberry, and the creepers, but beware of the poison ivy's waxen fruits. Those. large pods, bursting with flaky seeds, are the natural sequence of the rubythroat's favorite flower, the trumpet vine. Here's an old friend of ours, In a rich robe, heavy with jewels - the dogwood, almost as lovely as when in its spring gown of white. As you return home, you find that you have brought along some souvenirs in the shape of cockleburs. The woods still have a hold on you. Notes and News. Anybody going to Mexico City soon? If so, be sure to get in touch with the Club de Explbraciones de Mexico, and participate In one or more of the excursions made regularly by this fine organization. We are in receipt of a booklet containing the schediile of trips to bo made by our neighbors in sunny Mexico during the next few-weeks, and it is easy to see that this is a club of Interested, active outdoor folk. According to the latest yearbook of the Associated Mountaineering Clubs of North America, the Club de Ex- ploraciones de Mexico was organized in 1922, and has 286 active members. We send hearty greetings to our associates below the Rio Grande, and if any of them should visit Houston, which we hope they will do, a cordial invitation is extend.ed to join us in a hike along the wooded banks of beautiful Buffalo Bayou. Each issue of Wild Flower, official organ of the Wild Flower Preservation Society, Inc., is packed full of educational and inspirational material, and the October number, just received, is fully up to standard. The article on "Various Aspects of Wild Flower Preservation" is the most complete and practical treatment of the subject we have had the pleasure of studying, and should be read by every lover of wild flowers. Through the courtesy of Dr. H. W. Felter and the Cincinnati chapter of the society, a complete file of this publication is being kept by the Treasurer of the Outdoor Nature Club, and members are welcome to refer to this at any time. If you haven't been going on the outings, you have missed the best part of the program. Don't fear to accumulate a stock of corns and bunions, If you join in the regular hikes. It is not use of your feet that causes trouble, but misuse of them. The man who makes a habit of taking long hikes has no more use, for a corn plaster than an eagle has for opera glasses. And the ladies should tramp along, too. It is true that association with Nature in the great outdoors is broadening, but this is only in a mental and spiritual sense. In fact, surplus weight will disappear, provided the appetite aroused by the healthful exerciso does not defeat the purpose of the diet. Let's see if we can't displace the present day slogan of "Step on the gas!" with one more in line with our ideas: "Shake a hoofl". Pleasure hint: Drive east on Buffalo Drive before eight o'clock any sunny morning to catch the early sunlight on the wild morning glories. It's all free, including music by the mockingbird choir. (The Sidewalk Revue, in the Houston Chronicle).