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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1925
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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1925 - Image 2. October 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1146/show/1143.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1925). The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1925 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1146/show/1143

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1925 - Image 2, October 1925, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1146/show/1143.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9623
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f028_010_002.jpg
Transcript The Zephyr Page #2 One of the purposes of the Outdoor Nature Club is to make available for local lovers of the outdoors books, pamphlets and other Information covering every phase of nature study, woodcraft, camping and hiking, and wild life conservation. The club's library has made a promising start, with several good books in possession of the Custodian. Individual members have popular and scientific works, and files of magazines en outdoor topics, which any member is welcome to refer to, and the seeker after nature lore in printed form will always find ready cooperation at the Houston public library. Here are listed some publications that will be of great help to anyone desiring a better acquaintance with the flora and fauna of Texas: Check List of the Birds of Texas (Baylor Bulletin) by John K. Strecker. Lists all birds recorded as occuring in Texas, and the seasons in which they are to be found here. Check List of the Reptiles and Amphibians of Texas (Baylor Bulletin) by John K. Strecker. Lists all species found in Texas,I and section of state in which found. The Trees of Texas (University of Texas Bulletin), by Lewis. An illustrated booklet valuable to,the beginner in tree study. Five Hundred Wild FloWers of San Antonio and Vicinity, by Ellen Shultz. Miss Shultz*s book is indlsponsible on a trip throug the San Antonio region, and is helpful in almost any part of Texas. The Malvaeeoua Plants of Texas. A Key to the Families'and-Genera of the Wild Plants of Austin! Seed Plants, Ferns and Fern Allies of the Austin Region. The three last mentioned are University of Texas Bulletins', which may be of considerable help in the identification of plants. This list does not make any attempt at completeness, hut simply includes sources of information and guidance that are available to every member of the Outdoor Nature Club. Nearly everyone will recall one or more instances of high- powered modern advertising campaigns carried on' by fire-arm and munitions interests under the guise of "vermin" extermination campaigns. During the course of such events, the word vermin becomes one of the most comprehensive and elastic in the language, and exceeds charity in the capacity to cover a multitude of sins. There are, of course, several species of creatures which, if allowed to increase and multiply without interference, would soon render the country unfit for habitation by mankind. '• These range in si$e and character from the mosquito to the mountain lion. Every year, hundreds of thousands of dollars are spent in combatting these pests, the work being directed and carried on by scientists and trained workmen (not by gun-p owder salesmen). This is one of the activities that the United States Government carries on with a fair degree of system and thoroughness, and for that reason, as well as others, the words of Dr. Harry C. Oberholser, of the United States Biological Survey, bear some w eight for everyone whose thinking apparatus is In working order: "The activities of civilized man,are usually inimical to the large native wild mammals and birds, particularly the predatory species. By the great reduction in numbers of such of these animal, as prey on rodents, .the latter, relieved of their natural check, tend to increase enormously. Thus by man's often unwise efforts to pro-1 tect himself from what at first sight might appear to be injury, he sometimes brings upon himself much more serious damage; for such birds as hawks, owls, and even crows have an important place in the economy of nature, and to destroy them indiscriminately, as is sometimes practiced as well as preached, Is to exterminate the innocent and guilty together, with potentially disastrous results. Really obnoxious species, moreover, should be attacked only when and where they are actually damaging man's interest, for even those are in most Instances not wholly bad. Campaigns against them should be conducted only under the strict supervision of State or Federal authorities. ..».*.... Conservation, it is thus easily seen, Involves the repression of man's wild enemies, as well as the protection of his wild friends, but the weapon of destruction should be very judicious ly wielded, and only after careful investigation of the facts concerned and unbiased consideration of all the evidendej obtainable."