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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976
Image 7
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 7. October 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1111.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1976). The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 7. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1111

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 7, October 1976, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1111.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXV, No. 6, October 1976
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 25
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9861
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f025_010_007.jpg
Transcript Page 7 When the rail buggy trips were concluded many of us went on to Boy Scout and Smith's Woods for additional birding. Just sitting beneath some oaks at the edge of Boy Scout Woods we were treated to the sight of Baltimore Orioles (one of which was an adult in spectacular plumage); Summer Tanagers; Solitary, Yellow-throated and Red-eyed Vireos (a White-eyed Vireo was later seen back In the woods); Black-and-White, Northern Parula and Blackburnian Warblers; and American Redstarts. Seen In the woods were Empidonax Flycatchers, Great-crested Flycatcher, a Whip-poor-will and an Ovenbird. It was hard to leave this easy birding spot, but we decided to take another look at Smith's Woods. Sightings there were a Broad-winged Hawk, several Hummingbirds harassing a female Summer Tanager In the top of a tall tree, and two Magnolia Warblers flitting about in the understory growth. Just about the time we had to make up our minds about returning home or spending another night on the beach, a Whip-poor-will alighted on a limb almost above us. Our decision was to go to Bolivar Flats, eat supper, Flats we found an immense concentration of peeps, gul Ben Feltner's recent excellent seminar on shorebirds to determine that one huge flock was of one species: solidly packed together on the sands over an area of that there were more than two birds per square foot, into a small puddle of water left by the receding tid as he waded up on the sand, put his head under his wi when the dawn came. Apparently, he was ahead of the fatigue of the day's birding helped us to decide to s so, we could get in some early morning birding right then go on home. At BolIvar Is and terns. Aha! we thought: will help us here. We were able the Western Sandpiper. They were about 50' x 100', and I'm sure About 7:15 a lone GadwalI flew e. He was obviously a tired bird ng and didn't move. (He was gone flock!) The food, calm water and pend the night on the Flats. Al- there. All night long there was squawking and squabbling among the terns and gulls, but it was nice music by which to rest and sleep. By dawn's early light we explored the grassy area behind the sand flats to find Snowy, Piping, Semipalmated and Wilson's Plovers, several Horned Larks and some Seaside Sparrows. And — a pair of Sharp-tailet Sparrows pranced around the open area of an Isolated clump of grass for us to get a spectacular view of them and note the lovely ruddy ochre color on the face and breast of both; then they flitted up on some of the grass with seed heads open and calmly proceeded to feed on the seeds. According to the UTC Checklist we were very privileged to see these Sharp-tailed Sparrows in September. We noted the presence of Roseate Spoonbills, long-billed Curlew, Yellowlegs, Knots, Dowitchers, Marbled Godwits and Avocets; then decided that we must get started home. While waiting for the ferry we noted three Double-crested Cormorants sitting on the pilings. We couldn't resist the urge to make a run to West Galveston Island, and were glad we did, because we watched an immature Magnificent Frigatebird being harrassed by a gull as we drove along Sportsman's Road. The frigatebird came down and soared almost directly over us at a height of 30' to 50' so that we could see the hook of its bill, the long forked black tall, and the contrast between the gleaming white of the head and breast and the jet black of the wings, belly and tail. Using the telescope we could see four other frlgatebirds sitting on pilings out in West Bay. These frigate- birds are staying with us a little longer this year. Seeing an Osprey fly from a tall pole with a large fish in its talons was the final fillip of our birding week end. It flew to a fence post on the Moody Ranch at a considerable distance from the road to eat breakfast without interference from birdwatchers. Camping is a definite enhancement to our birding, for we can bird late and early, and in comfort! PLACES TO GO ** Debbie DeKeyzer reports that our WiIcrest Road Caracara seems to have moved east and south just a bit, and has been seen from Roark Road between Bellaire Blvd. and Blssonnet. ** Johnny Fay Barnett gave us directions to an interesting spot between Jacinto City and Galena Park. Take the Mercury Rd. exit from I — 10 (just east of the 610 East Loop intersection), go one mile and you will find the road rises and runs on top of a dike between two U.S. Government Dredge Disposal Areas. There Is a good bit of traffic, but the shoulders are wide enough in most places to pull off the road. Most of the water and birds were on the east side on the first of October, when we checked it out, but there were some birds on the west side too. In fact, we watched a King Rail take a bath in a mud puddle right out In the open on the west side. There were hundreds of Avocets, some Stilts, and many, many egrets, mostly Common and Snowy, and some Louisiana Herons. This road runs along the dike about a mile, and when It descends, becomes Main Street in Galena Park, then another approximate mile will bring you to Clinton Drive. However, we found the easiest and quickest way was from 1—10 on Mercury Drive. A scope would not only be helpful, but needed for part of the area.