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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 4. October 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1108.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1976). The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1108

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 4, October 1976, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1108.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXV, No. 6, October 1976
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 25
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9861
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f025_010_004.jpg
Transcript Page 4 Swifts flew Into rock crevices to roost and 2+ silent Black Swifts took quick drinks. Flashlights were needed for the descent and climb back out of the canyon. August 20: In the morning a "countable" Ringed Turtledove at Pershing Square and library in downtown LA before the flight to Seattle. In the early evening our caravan of 2 vans and 2 cars arrived at Ocean Shores, Washington. August 21: Our guides, Glen and Wanda Hoge, led us to woods for Chestnut-backed Chick adee, Townsend's, WiIson's, and Black-throated Gray Warblers, Bandtalled Pigeon, and an unexpected treat, 2 Black Swifts. The jetties were good for Common Murre, Rhinoceros Auklet, Pelagic and Brandt Cormorant, White-winged Scoter, Surfbird, Black Turnstone, Wandering Tattler, and Sooty Shearwater. The successful first day was celebrated at The Dunes with fresh salmon and wild berry pie while we watched tens of thousands of Shearwaters fly up the beach in an endless stream. August 22: The pelagic trip out of Westport, Wash., organized by Terry Wahl, weathered some rough swells but saw all species that could reasonably be expected, and in large numbers, as our boat circled a fleet of II Russian fishing vessels and one U.S. Coast Guard boat: Pigeon Guillemot, Common Murre, Rhinoceros Auklet, and Cas- sin's Auklet near shore; Sooty, Pink-footed, and New Zealand Shearwaters, Fork-tailed and Leach's Storm Petrels, Tufted Puffin, Black-footed Albatross, Fulmar, Skua, Parasitic, Pomarlne, and Long-tailed Jaegers, Marbled Murrelet and Sabine's Gull. At one moment I counted 18 Black-footed Albatross in my field vision. Later, with feet on a swaying shore, we met our next guide, Bill Harrington-Twelt. August 23: A detour south to the Hoh Valley Visitors Center to walk in the Olympic National Forest, an unlogged rain forest, found Gray Jays, Ruffed Grouse, Varied Thrush, Dipper and Wood Duck. Then we raced against the clock (stopped at Pillar Point for Mew Gull, Red-throated Loon) in order to catch ferries from Port Angeles to Townsend Point and from Anacortes to San Juan. The ferry rides are smoother than pelagic trips and also boast frequent sightings of alclds and servings of hot food— the latter a rare commodity on our schedule. August 24: Our trip to San Juan was successful as we saw 2+ Skylarks flush from bracken fern in grassy fields (Marilyn Crane's 600th), Harlequin Duck on rockless shores, Northwestern Crow In reasonably pure race, plus Bald Eagle and innumerable European Hare. Then the inveterate listers among us headed via ferry and road for Vancouver and the Crested Myna which flies with Starlings along roads by the airport. The lona Island Sewage Treatment Plant was good for Pectorals but Bill said no, the one potential Sharptailed Sandpiper was NOT. Last, we enjoyed all the tall waterfalls and deep canyons as we crossed the Northern Cascades until the dark descended and the rain commenced. We were grateful to reach our pine paneled housekeeping cabins. August 25: Mazama and Hart's Pass. After the caravan climbed the one lane road over the mountains, Jerry Baker and Thelma Smith had to retrace the route immediately because of a leaking gas tank. The rest of us hiked the mountains in the 40° drizzle, seeing few birds but abundant wild flowers in pink, yellow, blue and red. Down off the mountains we picked up the Lewis Woodpeckers flycatching from the tops of trees between Twisp and Methow on 153 and Chukar (Betty Cornelius' 600th). August 26: A foray Into the desert near Othello found Burrowing and Short-eared Owls, Sage Thrasher, Sage Sparrow, Prairie Falcon, Chukar. During the last days some visited Turnbull NWR where 2 m. and 2 im. Trumpeter Swans were swimming In their lake (each nesting pair defends one entire lake as its territory). East of Spokane found Gray Partridge. Others saw Long-eared Owl at Moxee and Pygmy Owl and Calliope Hummingbird at Wenas Creek. At White Pass near Mt. Ranier the group saw a Northern Three-toed Woodpecker on the Cascade Crest Trail. Gladys Galbreath found a piece of the trunk of a recently cut Alaskan Cedar which had been between 750 to 900 years old, older than Columbus. We spent our last day, August 28, at Mt. Ranier. We took in the bright blue skies and white capped peak as we hiked in meadows of flowers and across fields of snow. It was the first clear day in weeks at Mt. Ranier, and the views of the glacier were superb. We celebrated our successes with a last taste of Washington Salmon that night. When our trip organizer and coordinator, Paul Nimmons, called out the checklists we had seen 186 species in Calif., 207 species in Washington, for a combined trip list of 273 species. Most were extremely pleased to have the Condor—that "big" old buzzard"—on their lists but thought the Black-footed Albatross the most Impressive. Anyone following our footsteps will find Jim Lane's Guide to Southern Calif. and Terry Wahl's Guide to Washington (available from ABA) helpful.