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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976
Image 3
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 3. October 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1107.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1976). The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1107

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 3, October 1976, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1107.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXV, No. 6, October 1976
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 25
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9861
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f025_010_003.jpg
Transcript Page 3 Is presently owned by the four granddaughters of the original Mr. Smith: Mrs. Eveline. Tuttle, Mrs. Bernlce Bolin, Mrs. Sadie Stanley, and Mrs. Lucille Guidry. All of these gracious ladies still reside in the High Island area, and It is by their good graces that the interested public is allowed to enter the woods. Two of the area's most avid and knowledgeable birders, Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Brannon, reside on the ground and do much to maintain and protect it. To the scientists and educators of the region, in particular those with more than just a passing interest in birdlife ( as seen In John Tveten, Jim Ashcraft, Mike Hoke, Michigan's Dr. Novy, et. al.), High Island offers the opportunity for field observation and research that cannot be duplicated In the laboratory. The overgrown thickets of lantana and honeysuckle, in combination with the live oak, hackberry, and yaupon mottes located there, seasonally harbor and replenish thousands of migrating land birds on their way both to and from Central and South America. In addition to these "migrant traps", the coastal wetlands that encircle the mound provide essential nesting grounds for water fowl. And finally, to that scrupulous, exacting, and seemingly possessed section of humanity known among the local inhabitants simply as "those birders", the overlding importance of the High Island eco-system can be demonstrated best In memories of mulberry trees abounding with northern orioles and scarlet tanagers, pecan and live oak aments teeming with vireos, and the exhilaration of observing in a solitary tree, twenty or more species of the family of birds responsible for selling more field guides than the entire remaining A.O.U. checklist combined, the warblers. (I would like to thank Annabelle Nlcar and Mrs. placeable historical resources and memories). Ruby Vance for access to their Irre- WESTWARD HO! A Summary of the OG Trip to the West Coast, by PhylI Is P~ul Nimmons On Friday, August 13, feeling especially lucky, the majority of the group of 17 climbed aboard their 11:45 AM jet and were whisked up, up and away for a 1:50 arrival In Los Angeles, where our California guide, Ed Navojosky, binoculars around his neck, met us, and Shirley Bailey of Riverside, California, was a one-woman welcoming committee, waving placard. Baggage and wits collected, we all climbed into Victor Emanuel's Mercedes Benz—we were going first class—bus and headed up over the mountains north of LA and down into the San Joaquin Valley and on to Bakersfleld. August 14: Destination Mt. Pinos and a California Condor. We detoured slightly for two LeConte's Thrashers found between road and washes in salt brush just one to two miles west of Maricopa. Also Say's Phoebe. On top of Mt. Pinos with the Audubon Condor Naturalist, John Borneman, from 11:00-6:00, our hopes and the temperature dropped, as the winds came up without any Condors. We saw Red-tailed, Sharp-shinned, Cooper's Hawks, Golden Eagle, Pygmy Nuthatch, Brown Creeper, Mt. Chickadee, both Mt. and W. Bluebirds, Sage Sparrow (In sage meadow just below the Radar Station). August 15: A return to Mt. Pinos. Stopping on road I mile below McGlI I Campgrounds produced Williamson Sapsucker, Whiteheaded Woodpecker, Mt. Quail (the early birder can find Calif, and Mt. Quail in good numbers). No one turned up a Calliope Hummingbird among the Rufous and Anna's. Then we descended to the Edmonston Pumping Station on the Tejo.n Ranch where 4+ Cslif. Condors were sighted within 30 minutes. Near Cas- taic Ed Navajosky had a special place for Lawrence's Goldfinch which also produced Wrentit, Calif. Thrasher, Lazuli Bunting, Black-headed Grosbeak. August 16: Plummer Park in LA for Spotted Dove, then the beach and jetties for Calif, Western, and Heermann's Gulls, Black Turnstone, Wandering Tattler, Black Oystercatcher Surfbird, Brown Pelican, Surf Scoter and western Grebe. On Malibu Beach we found Elegant Tern and witnessed a real live police chase with gun and handcuffs—we were in CalIfornia! August 17: Tuna Canyon and MuGu Park are good early in the morning for passerines, Nuttall's Woodpecker, and Calif.Quail. We made a special roadside stop for Tricolored Blackbird and visited Santa Paula for the Violet-crowned Hummingbird—the first Cal- If. record. August 18: Pelagic trip out of Ventura on very calm seas where the variety of birds was excellent although the numbers were few. Pigeon Guillemot, Brandt's Cormorant, Xantus' Murrelet, Pink-footed and New Zealand Shearwaters, Arctic Tern, Parasitic and Pomarine Jaegers, Black Storm Petrel, Pelagic Cormorant, Peregrine Falcon. August 19: Nohoqui State Park near the Danish Town, Solvang, for the Yellow-billed Magpie and Acorn Woodpeckers up to four on a limb; Costa's, Allen's, Anna's and Black-chinned Hummingbirds at Shirley Bailey's feeder tn Riverside; in Angeles National Forest a hike up Santa Anita Canyon to Sturtevant Falls where at 8:00 PM Vaux's