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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 2. October 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1106.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1976). The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1106

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976 - Image 2, October 1976, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1119/show/1106.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 6, October 1976
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXV, No. 6, October 1976
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 25
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9861
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f025_010_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 REDDISH EGRET SURVEY Reddish Egrets have been marked near Rockport, Texas with red and yellow plastic colot bands to study movements and to determine age at first breeding. The bands have been placed above the Intratarsal joint. Please send reports, Including color of band, leg banded, date and location of sighting, and activities to: Richard T. Paul, Research Department, National Audubon Society, 115 Indian Mound Trail, Tavernler, Florida, 33070. AROUND AND ABOUT ** We have been asked to calI to your attention the recent petition by Governor Dolph Briscoe to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service which would allow Golden Eagles to be killed in 31 Texas counties by any rancher or landowner who found it necessary to kill them for protection of livestock. Your comments on this should be sent to Briscoe in Austin, and Nathaniel Reed, Asst. Secretary of U.S. Dept. of Interior, Washington, D.C. 20240. ** Russ Clapper says that just before the recent teal season opened, a state biologist, flying over the area between the Sabine and Trinity rivers, estimated 350,000 to 500,000 teal had moved in. ** A new smaller-format edition of "Operation Nature Guide", 50 pages of addresses and phone numbers of volunteers and other sources in virtually every state plus a few in Canada and England to give the traveling birder and nature enthusiast information about where to go and what to see Is now off the press. Published by the Tahoma Audubon Society in Tacoma: $1.30 postage included, from Nature Guide, 34915 - 4th Ave., So., Federal Way, Washington 98003. —from Audubon Leader ** A letter from our departed friends and fellow-members, David and Dorothy Lefkovits, says they have been working hard, getting settled in their new home near Wood- vllle. They have already recorded 56 species of birds in their yard in just a couple of months, but say they have no hope of approaching their record of 161 species made at their home in Baytown. Their mail is delivered to a rural box: R.R. #1, Box 86CI3, Woodville, Texas 75979, and their phone number is 713-283-5145. HIGH ISLAND — A PERSPECTIVE by Ted. L. Eubanks, Jr. To measure a community's value to society, one must take into account far more than just a monetary assessment of its capital holdings. The area's historical heritage, the talents and resources of its inhabitants, the critical IrreplaceabiIity of its unique eco-system; all are necessary contributors to a broad, well-informed appraisal. Fifty miles to the southeast of the metropolis of Houston, Texas, at the northeastern base of the Bolivar Peninsula, conspicuously stands a live oak shrouded mound known historically as High Island. Presently recognized for its fiscal Importance to the petroleum Industry with the surrounding coastal plains containing some of the oldest active oil fields in the State of Texas, this immense elevated salt dome more importantly offers both a singular eco(oglcaJ significance and a historical legacy that has all but disappeared from the Texas Gulf Coast. To a historian with an abiding Interest in Texiana, such as local resident Annabelle Nicar, High Island holds a key position in the overview of events that have shaped Texas and Its people, particularly in the coastal region. Long used by the Karawanka and Atakapa tribes as a haven from the storms which cyclically sweep the Gulf expanse, the non-flooding crest of the dome (approximately twentyfive feet above the surrounding wetlands) subsequently was utilized by assorted pirates, fishermen, and trappers who occupied the region periodically, including the Infamous Jean Lafitte. In the early I800's the Mexican Government finally granted the dome and all of the coastal lands toward the southwest to one Martin Dunman and his brother Joseph (the region Is still recognized as the Martin Dunman Survey). The township of High Island became officially sanctioned in 1835, but the community didn't flourish until 1901, when the Guffey Company drilled the first oil well in the area. This venture combined with the famous Spindletop field that had been brought in earlier in the year by Captain Lucas, Initiated the era of the "East Texas Oil Boom". The settlement rapidly prospered with the influx of workers and jobs brought in by this fledgling Industry, and tracts such as the "Old Townslte" (located adjacent to what is presently known as "Boy Scout Woods") developed in the ensuing years. Perhaps one of the most ecologically captivating areas of High Island, certainly to regional naturalists and birders, is a dense live oak motte on the northern edge of the crest known as Smith's Woods. The fresh water supply that It offers was the pri- mary'reason for It first being settled in the late 1800's by George E. Smith (the old well house still stands just south of the main entrance to the estate). The property