Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 20, December 1963
Image 3
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 20, December 1963 - Image 3. December 1963. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1104/show/1094.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1963). The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 20, December 1963 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1104/show/1094

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 20, December 1963 - Image 3, December 1963, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1104/show/1094.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 11, No. 20, December 1963
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XI, No. 20, December 1963
Contributor (Local)
  • Ellis, Pat
  • Ellis, Jim
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date December 1963
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 21
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9848
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f021_012_003.jpg
Transcript and Pink-footed. Just before we turned around we ran into a large flock (200) of Shearwaters, resting on the water and here we found the uncommon New Zealand Shearwater. Some of the Shearwaters were so gorged with food they couldn't take off. In fact, they even dove to avoid the boat. Also, there were many Jaegers offshore. We had as many as 10 following the boat- all Pomarine and Parasitic. The Petrels were more difficult because they would not follow the boat and the only way to separate the Ashy and Black is by flight. We did get a fairly good look at the uncommon Fork-tailed Petrel though. We saw about 50 Sabine's Gulls - a vers? distinctive bird. Also, perched on a piece of kelp was a Red Phalarope. A Skua followed the boat back for quite away. We also saw a 25 foot whaleS The small boat was advantageous in that the Captain steered from the top deck where we were, but, coming in, it became quite rough and you really had to hold on. Otherwise the trip was quite pleasant - no fog and you barely needed a jacket. I'm disappointed though because we didn't see an Albatross but I guess there wouldn't be anything to go back for if we had! In all, we must have seen about 500 pelagic individuals. FROM AUDUBON FIELD NOTES Vol. 17 No 4 The Delta Waterfowl Research Station (Delta, Manitoba) invites Audubon Field Notes readers who would like to cooperate in a field study of Non- hunting Mortality in Waterfowl to request a form for filing such reports. Bird-watchers, who spend most of the weekends afield, can make a valuable contribution. Local Audubon Societies and bird clubs might well consider making this a study project for the season, compiling the information submitted by their members and thus minimizing the paper work at both ends-- yours and the Research Station's. If you wisji to contribute to this study, write; Professor George W. Cornwell, Dept.of Forestry and Wildlife, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, Virginia. Copies of the questionnaire will not be ready for distribution until January, but the sooner notes are kept on dead waterfowl afield the better. Information on the September-December 1963 period is especially desired. Note should be made of sex, age, location, date, numbers found, species, cause of death (if determined), etc. THE BATTLE OF THE HUMMINGBIRDS By Linda Snyder L0-15-63 My yard is no longer a safe place to roam! I am walking along when I hear an angry chittering and a strong whir of wings and I cringe as two aggressive midgets of the Avian society go zooming by within inches of my head. My yard is an arena for battling Hummingbirds. In each corner is a feeder with one hungry hummer guarding it against any intruders. The trouble is there are six feeders and some fifteen hummers who don't understand the polite rule of taking turns. The battles are phenomenal! It is worse than watching a tennis match as my head turns to follow the angry antics of these midgets. In one battle the clash of bills is ominous while one hummer actually knocks another to the ground and continues attacking. The poor hummer on the ground is helpless since he can neither stand nor walk on his tiny feet. My movement to his aid is enough to scare away the attacking hummer and enables the victim to fly away apparently unharmed. Then, there is the "elevator dance* when two hummers face each other and go up and down like two tiny elevators - a height of ten feet. Only when three or four birds gang up on a feeder at once does the harassed guard give way. It is quite a sight to see five hummers trying to feed from one little tube simultaneously - some even turn upside down. A large bumble-bee joins the melee, but, 1 find it is really a hummer without a tail. As yet, I haven't enticed a Rufous Hummingbird. Addendum (Nov.l) - Mr. No-tail inherited a feeder and stayed around a couple of days before disappearing. 1 thought he would have to stay until he had more ballast but, evidently, he took his long Gulf trip sans tail. The Rufous (sub-adult male) finally appeared on Oct. 25th and fed through Oct. 28th. Now it is time for the feeders to come down and, somehow, before March I must find a way out of my current dilemma, however fascinating the phenomenon of the avian battles in miniature.