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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 11, November 1989
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 11, November 1989 - Image 4. November 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1045/show/1038.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 11, November 1989 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1045/show/1038

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 11, November 1989 - Image 4, November 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1045/show/1038.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 11, November 1989
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXVIII, No. 11, November 1989
Contributor (Local)
  • Price, Libby
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9874
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f005_010_004.jpg
Transcript The next morning we walked up the mountainside from the Rio Sabinas through tropical trees and plants. The air was thick and laden with moisture as fog enshrouded the mountains above us. Thicket (Rufescent) Tinamous called with their plaintive but loud whistles, enticing us to pause time and again in hopes of seeing this shy bird. Farther up the slope we found a feeding flock which included a nice male White-winged Tanager and a Yellow-throated Euphonia. Walking along we heard a strange bird calling with spirited chippering squeals and squeaks. We could not figure out where all the sound was coming from until we discovered, of all things, a hummingbird, a Wedge-tailed Sabrewing making all the noise. On the way down we found Golden- crowned Warblers, a Tropical Parula and a Lineated Woodpecker. That afternoon it was onward to Ciudad Mante where we planned to stay to do the El Naranjo count. We birded the next day in the count circle which is in the state of San Luis Potosi, about an hour's drive from Mante. At a waterfall called El Salto we found Red-crowned Parrots, an endemic of Northeastern Mexico which I was pleased to see. The parrots were beautiful with their bright red crowns and bright green bodies. When flying, they called "cleo-cleo" which helps to identify them. A beautiful irredescent green Fork-tailed Emerald Hummingbird perched in a field near the falls. A Golden-olive Woodpecker drummed in a tree as Black- headed Saltators called below. As we were leaving the falls we found a Bat Falcon perched in a tree and admired it for some time. On the way back from El Salto we spotted a Jaguarundi, the darker colored red phase, crossing the road ahead of us. Incredibly, up in the mountains on the same day, another Jaguarundi crossed the road ahead of us, this time the lighter colored grayish phase. Then we proceeded westward and upward into the humid oak forest zone of the mountains. While walking down the road we heard a woodcreeper call. Not finding it, we plunged into the thicket. We got glimpses of a large woodcreeper inching its way up the back of a tree. It seemed that no sooner did we find a woodcreeper but it would drop down to the base of the next tree. Yet our patience was rewarded, for we obtained good looks at not one but all three species found in the El Naranjo area! At first we found an Ivory-billed Woodcreeper with its striped back, then a Spot-crowned with its plain back and finally a small olive-gray Olivaceous. The woodcreepers are most interesting birds, totally unrelated to our Brown Creeper despite their similarities of shape and behavior. They belong to their own family, the Dendrocolaptidae, which is exclusively in the new world tropics. The woodcreepers are much larger than our Brown Creeper but similar In shape, often with a slender decurved bill, and in behavior, in that they hug a tree trunk, inching upward, then dropping to the base of the next tree. Woodcreepers and Brown Creepers offer a fine example of parallel evolution from widely separate bird families. Also in the oaks we came upon a group of three Rufous-browed Peppershrikes with a rufous eyebrow on a gray face and a large vireo-like bill, and with them were a Blue Mockingbird and a Clay- colored Robin. Some species we saw almost every day were the Melodious Blackbird, Mexican Crow, Brown and Green Jays and the Spot-breasted Wren with its spotted underparts and its call sounding just like someone running a finger through the teeth of a comb. Kiskadee, Social and Boat-billed Flycatchers, Couch's Kingbird and Red-billed Pigeons were fairly common. Gray and Roadside Hawks can be seen along the roads in El Naranjo. We noticed that parrots and euphonias seemed less numerous possibly due to the 1983 freeze causing less wild food. On El Naranjo count day we birded Bob's area which included a lowland tropical area at the base of the mountains near El Sabinito up to the "cornfield" in the mountain oaks. The prime birding spot in this area is a small canyon which encloses a stream with tropical plants and birds. Here we found a Blue-crowned Motmot, an Elegant Trogon and a Mountain Trogon. In the brush nearby were numerous Golden-crowned Warblers, a Pale-billed Woodpecker and another Elegant Trogon. In some trees across a field were a flock of Hooded Grosbeaks, Yellow-winged and White-winged Tanagers and a Brown-backed Solitaire. We spotted a beautiful Fan-tailed Warbler walking among some rocks. Farther up the mountain at the "cornfield" we found a nice flock of White-collared Seedeaters and a Rusty Sparrow popped up briefly to perch on a stump. Returning to the lower part of our area we found a large flock of warblers and other birds including a Squirrel Cuckoo and a Smoky-brown Woodpecker. The day after the count we birded the El Estribo area, which is south of El Naranjo in the count circle. After a while we heard a Collared Forest-falcon give its loud "maw" call. Bob answered back and the falcon called back to us. We found it perched up on a hill. No sooner had we all got a good look than it was driven off by Brown Jays. In a thorn scrub habitat we got an excellent look at a pair of Crimson-collared Grosbeaks. It was nice to compare the greenish female with the red and black male. Bob explained that this species and the Red-Crowned Parrot are the two endemic species of Northeastern Mexico. It was great to have seen both on this trip. In the afternoon we birded the "aguada," a lake and a canal near Ciudad Mante. Along the canals we spotted the small Green Kingfisher, the larger green Amazon, the Belted and the large Ringed Kingfisher. In the bushes along a ditch we saw the Gray-crowned Yellowthroat and the Common Yellow- throat. At the edge of the lake we pished and up popped two Yellow-crowned Yellowthroats out of the water hyacinths. They are shy birds and only gave us a brief look. To round out the scene were numerous Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Northern Jacana walking about, and a Peregrine Falcon perched in a tree. After seven days of birding in Mexico we had seen over 200 species of birds (not counting those seen in the U.S.). The potential for lifers is very great. This trip I saw 24 lifers in Mexico and in 1983, my first visit, I saw over 50 lifers. So many are possible because once you cross the Tropic of Cancer and reach the Rio Sabinas you are truly in the Neotropics. As George M. Sutton said in At a Bend in a Mexican River, "in this area you can feel the pulse beat of a heart beating somewhere in South America." It is most interesting to leave our (continued next page)