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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 12, April 1958
Image 11
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 12, April 1958 - Image 11. April 1958. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1025/show/1021.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1958). The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 12, April 1958 - Image 11. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1025/show/1021

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 12, April 1958 - Image 11, April 1958, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1025/show/1021.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 12, April 1958
Contributor (Local)
  • Hoffman, Louise
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1958
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 9
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9843
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f009_004_011.jpg
Transcript 1956 Page 6 241 Del. - Md. - N.J. - Pa. 20"0 74 - 19 May 13 234 S, E, Texas 208 48 - 14 May 6, 233 ' " D. C, Regional 205 81 - 20 May 12 230 Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas 102 44 - 14 Apr„ 15 230 Maryland (State wide) 198 110 - 23 May 5 228 Sacramento, California loo 21-9 Apr, 29 168 St, Marks, Florida 45 12-5 Apr. 14 Apr, 21 165 Mobile, Alabama 37 8-3 162 Wilmington, N. C, IS 28-8 Apr. 21 125 Greensboro, N. C. 15 34 - 16 Apr. 28 1957 262 South Texas 185 43 - 14 Apr. 28 261 S. E. Texas 219 66 - IV Apr. 28 222 Del. - Md. - N.J. - Pa. 200 55 - 14 May 12 21V Maryland (State wide) 198 131 - 19 May 4 212 D. C. Regional 205 237 - 20 May 11 194 Mobile, Alabama 60 14 - 8 Apr. 13 180 St. Marks, Florida 60 10 - 7 Apr. 20 142 Wilmington, N. C. 15 21-8 Apr. 27 ~1"28" Greensboro, N, C, 15 84 - 11 Apr. 27 ********************** SCARLET TANAGER - Burnished Black and Blazing Red From Our Amazing Birds 'by Robert S. Lemmon No North American bird Is more brilliantly colored than the glowing scarlet and jet-black male of this tanager speoies, and few can bring the thrill you feel when you see one clearly for the first time. Whether he is high in a tree, flying across a country road ahead of you, or feeding briefly on your lawn, you cannot escape the impression that a literal fragment of the fabulous Tropics has just flashed into view. Actually the tanager tribe is predominantly a tropical group, and a large one. Of the three hundred-odd speeies, all confined to the New World, only five are found in North Americas the Western, Hepatic, and Cooper's on the West Coast, the Summer Tanager in the lower Central and Southern States, and the Scarlet, whose breeding range Is from the. southern Canadian Provinces to South Carolina and Arkansas, with Colombia, Bolivia, and Peru as a winter resort. Scarlet Tanagers are real warm-weather birds and seldom put in their springtime appearance until the trees are well in leaf. As with so many birds, the males arrive first, sometimes in considerable numbers. Even this late in the season a cold northeast storm can so numb them and the insects->whioh comprise their diet that many become so nearly helpless that they alight on the ground in all sorts of odd places, including open roads and suburban sidewalks. If the storm1persists for two or three days, some of them succumb to cold and hunger, and in some areas many are killed by oars on the highways, Normally, Scarlet Tanagers spend most of their time well up In the trees, where the thick foliage, coupled with their rather deliberate movements, makes them quite difficult to see. The males are great singers, though, and their jolly caroling, faintly rough when near by, can be heard for a long distance. They are one of the few birds that have the gift of ventriloquism, which makes the problem of locating the concealed singer still more difficult. It is early summer before these fantastic birds set about raising their one annual brood of four or five, in a sizable thin nest of twigs, grass, and rootlets well out on a horizontal branch usually about twenty feet from the ground. The female, soberly dressed in unobtrusive yellowish green and du3ky gray, takes over the whole task of incubation, for her brilliant mate would be far too noticeable for such secretive work. But he pitches into the feeding job with a will as soon as the young hatch, and altogether is a thoroughly devoted husband and father. By early October the whole tanager family is on the way south, and at this time you can scarcely tell the old male from the female and young, for his gorgeous springtime red has been exchanged for an Imitation of