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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 12, April 1958
Image 3
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 12, April 1958 - Image 3. April 1958. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1025/show/1013.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1958). The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 12, April 1958 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1025/show/1013

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 12, April 1958 - Image 3, April 1958, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1025/show/1013.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 12, April 1958
Contributor (Local)
  • Hoffman, Louise
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1958
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 9
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9843
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f009_004_003.jpg
Transcript Page 2 song from all directions. These sprightly little songsters are very good at hiding behind a leaf or a clump of moss -- and only the lucky ones caught glimpses of these diminutive warblers. The White-eyed Vireo, another hard-to-see-bird, reminded us, with his cheery song, that the warm days of spring were not too far away. Myrtle and Black-and-White Warblers were also in the tall trees as well as Chickadees, Tufted Titmice, Solitary Vireos, and many others. Our road passed through a marshy area where a few water birds were found, including one Ring-necked Duok and a mystery bird perched on a tall stump which proved to be a Great Blue Heron. By noon we had reached Hinkle's Ferry and decided to spread our picnic lunch under large pecan trees on the banks of the Bernard River. This ferry is about to take its place with other relics of the past, for as soon as a new bridge up the river is completed, Hinkle's Ferry will be discontinued. Across the river and on toward Sargent, the road passed over several interesting little streams. At one we watched a Spotted Sandpiper teetering on the shore and enjoyed the antics of a pair of Carolina Wrens who kept popping in and out of their home - a hole in an old bridge piling. A Ruby-crowned Kinglet made its appearance here as well as a Red-shouldered Hawk and many Myrtle Warblers that were beginning to acquire spring finery. Several miles down the road we crossed a little creek of clear running water, lined with willows, and here we spied one of our most beautiful flycatchers - a male Vermilion, This one, perched on a dead willow limb, made numerous dashes after tasty morsels, always returning to the same perch and giving everyone an opportunity to admire his vivid colors and acrobatic talents. By the time we reached the beach at Sargent, the thick gray clouds had closed in, and a sharp wind whipped the waves on the shore until spray from the icy water splashed us as we searched the beach for shells and driftwood. Because of the water, few birds were on the beach, but as we were leaving, a flight of White Ibis flew single file up the shore line. Other interesting birds noted during the day were three Caracaras feeding with vultures In a pasture, eight or ten Rough-winged Swallows perched on a light wire, and large flocks of Snow and Blue Geese in the air on the coastal prairie near Sargent. The leader of this pleasant trip was Jimmie Murray, others who attended were: Eva and C, B. Gilman, Louise and Henry Hoffman, Leota Stilwell, Josiephine Wilkin, Charlotte Reindl, Helen Wolfer, Larry Semander, Carl Aiken, Ronald Fowler, Mrs, J. A. Snyder and Clinton Snyder from Baytown, Robert Simpson, Mr. and Mrs, Tom Daniel, Austin Evans from Freeport, and Norma Oates, ********************** CLEARING HOUSE March 2 - Clinton Snyder found a Palm Warbler east of Cedar Bayou, March 8-3 Parula Warblers, 2 Black-and-White Warblers, and 1 Canada Goose noted on the Brazos River close to Sugarland, (John O'Neill) About 35 Golden Plover were seen at Westheimer Road and Addicks- Howell Road, (Ella Wolfer and Norma Oates) March 9 - Armand Yramategui and Carl Aiken found ah American Bittern at Palmer Lake in East Texas. Red-cockaded Woodpecker and Fish Crow noted at the Little Thicket Nature Sanctuary by Joe Heiser and Armand Yramategui. Ronald Fowler found a Screech Owl on a nesting box and two Red- breasted Nuthatches at 431 Knipp Road. Clinton Snyder noted 5 Common Terns on Galveston Island. Their calls were the main identifying characteristic. Short-eared Owl seen on Katy-Hockley Road south of Longenbaugh ranch. (Hardin Craig, Jr.) March 10 - John O'Neill observed a Purple Finch In his yard at 10723 Belnhorn Road. March 11 - William T. Smith brought a YELLOW RAIL to the Museum of Natural History In Hermann ParlFT" The rail was found dead on a road near Pearland, and because of its condition only the wings and head were kept. Black Terns noted at Baytown Tunnel by Clinton Snyder.