Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 12, December 1983
Image 4
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 12, December 1983 - Image 4. December 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1010/show/1005.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1983). The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 12, December 1983 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1010/show/1005

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 12, December 1983 - Image 4, December 1983, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1010/show/1005.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 12, December 1983
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXII, No. 12, December 1983
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date December 1983
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 16
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9868
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f016_008_004.jpg
Transcript (5) Don't accept other people's I.D.'s out of hand. This is tied closely to #4. If you are content to accept other people',s identifications, you become little more than a name collector, and you might as well collect stamps. In our brave new world of listing, far too many people have taken this role. The game is much more enjoyable if you know the bird yourself next time. (6) Use your ears as well as your eyes. Just as looking at common birds helps you to learn rarer ones, so listening to them helps in the same manner. Excellent recordings are now available of almost all North American birds. Study them as you would a field guide, in your spare time. A well-trained ear may be responsible for your finding a rarity. The only U.T.C. record of Western Wood Pewee was the result of such an event when Jim Morgan and Ted Eubanks utilized Morgan's familiarity with the call from previous trips West to identify then locate the bird on Bolivar. Two outstanding local ear-birders are Noel Pettingell and Wes Cureton. In the case of the former, I would judge 80% of Noel's bird finding is done purely by ear. I birded with Wes on the El Naranjo Christmas Count last year and did not see him with his hands out of his pockets for the first hour or so (too cold I suppose); yet he managed to identify 25 or 30 birds, all correctly I might add, in an area he had not birded extensively before. Two of them turned out to be really good finds. Later in the same day he found his lifer Fan-tailed Warbler by hearing it first and then searching it out. (7) Don't shy away from the tough birds. "I can never learn the sparrows." "Shore- birds all look the same." How many times have you said or heard something like that? The truth is: the more difficult the bird is to identify, the more fun it is to go after. There is no shame or pain in being perplexed. Every birder I know makes mistakes; the good ones admit them. The way to approach those difficult families is to learn one or two birds well, a tenet put forth - number 1. If you learn to identify the Red Knot, the Sanderling, the Long- Billed Dowitcher and the Least Sandpiper, you will end up knowing how to identify practically all the shorebirds that show up here. Know the Savannah Sparrow, Lincoln's Sparrow and LeConte's Sparrow and you have won the battle and eventually the war. Familiarity does not breed contempt, it lengthens lists. (8) Learn to associate birds and habitats. It can save a lot of time in the long run. Just as you would not dream of finding a Willow Ptarmigan on Bolivar Flats, you will not find a Grasshopper Sparrow in a marsh. It helps to know that, it eliminates that particular sparrow from the birds that just came up off the wet ground ahead of you. . <* (9) Never stop birding. While attending the Bluebonnet Bowl some years ago, I . noticed a flock of Water Pipits sharing Rice Stadium with the two teams involved. The birds kept shifting away from the action all afternoon. I soon had the people immediately around me more interested in the birds than the game. I really learned a lot about Water Pipits that afternoon, especially concerning the peculiarities of flight and "jizz". I saw my lifer Swallow-tailed Kite while on my way to shop in LaPorte. I was able to convert that rather boring chore into forty- five minutes of Swallow-tailed Kite watching. On both these occasions I had binoculars handy. These are a few suggestions that might prove helpful if you feel the need for improvement. Remember - don't give up. Ten years ago Jim Morgan couldn't even spell birds; now he leads field trips and co-compiles the Freeport Count. If Jim can do it, anybody can. Send bird records for Clearing House before 3rd of the month to: David Dauphin, 7315 Cottonwood Drive, Baytown, 77521 383-3955 Qll*Wh^k\<MA4t^ The Clearing House is a monthly record of bird sightings made on the Upper Texas Coast. How to read the CH: Species: Location—(how many)date,observers. Those common species which can be easily identified and are widely distributed in the UTC will also be listed, followed by the number of reports, with the lowest and highest number of individuals seen in parenthesis, i.e. (l-40). Noteworthy sightings will be underlined, capitalized, or both, according to their status. All observations reported below must be accepted by the Checklist Committee (Ben Feltner, Jim Morgan and Noel Pettingell) before they are considered valid and Included in the next checklist. Sightings lacking details, when required, will not be included in the Clearing House. Submitters who forget details should send their notes to a member of the Checklist Committee. Loon, Common: 3 reports (1-12) Grebe, Horned: E.Galv.—(5)28,A Grebe, Eared: 4 reports (1-20) Grebe, Pied-billedi 6 reports (l-25) Pelican, Whitei 6 reports (2-100) Cormorant, Double-crestedi 7 reports (1-300) Cormorant, Olivaceoust 3 reports (1-10) Anhingat 5 reports (l-4o) Heron, Great Bluet 6 reports (1-35) Heron, Green-backedi 3 reports (1-6) Heron, Little Bluei 4 reports (1-10) Egret, Cattlei 5 reports (2-500) Egret, Reddishi Baytown—2(20),B Egret, Greati 8 reports (1-50) Egret, Snowy: 8 reports (1-15) Heron, Trlooloredi 6 reports (1-10) Night-Heron, Black-crownedi 5 reports (1-35) Night-Heron, Yellow-crowned: 3 reports (1-13) Bittern, American: Brazos Bend St. Park—(l)26,CG Ibis, White-facedi 3 reports (l-5J>) Ibis, Whitei 4 reports (1-50) Spoonbill, Roseatei W.Chambers Go—(150)20,B Goose, Canadai 5 reports (1-3000) Goose, Greater White-frontedi 4 reports (15-15,000) Goose, Snow: 7 reports (10-75,000) Goose, Rossi W.Harris Co—(5)26,C Whistling-Duck, Black-belliedi 4 reports (10-2.500) Mallardi 4 reports (5-150) Duck, Mottled: 8 reports (2-30) Gadwalli 5 reports (5-50) Pintail, Northerni 6 reports (4- Teal, Green-winged: 5 reports (4-^ Teal, Blue-wingedt Brazos Bend St, Teal, Cinnamoni 4 reports (1-12) Wigeon, Americani 6 reports (1-30) Shoveler, Northern! 6 reports (3-500) ,000) .000) Park— (50)26,OG