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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 12, December 1983
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 12, December 1983 - Image 3. December 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1010/show/1004.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1983). The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 12, December 1983 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1010/show/1004

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 12, December 1983 - Image 3, December 1983, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1010/show/1004.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 32, No. 12, December 1983
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXII, No. 12, December 1983
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date December 1983
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 16
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9868
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f016_008_003.jpg
Transcript of flycatchers. Thirteen species have been recorded. Most noteworthy were the second UTC record of Black Phoebe discovered by John Trochet, and two sightings of Say's Phoebe. The Black Phoebe and one of the Say's were photographed by Ted Eubanks, Jr. On Several trips, 7 to 10 Vermilion Flycatchers were recorded in a single day. Five species of vireos and 26 species of warblers have been recorded in the park. Two species, Prothonotary Warbler and American Redstart, were observed in summer and in such numbers as to influence status changes reflected eventually in the 6th edition (January, 1980) of the UTC Checklist. As many as 20 singing male Prothonotary Warblers could be found among the park's swamps and wooded sloughs. No doubt, the species is a common nester in its preferred habitat on the UTC. However, prior to visits to the park, access to this habitat type was very limited. I made a most exciting discovery on June 18, 1977 when I found two singing territorial American Redstarts in a heavy forest in the park. For four successive summary singing Redstarts could be found. Both males and females were observed, and once, Ted and I observed a male carrying food. Unfortunately, a nest or very young fledglings were never found. Fifteen species of sparrows have been recorded in the park. Savannah, Henslow's and LeConte's sparrows have been observed in the grasslands and many other species have been observed elsewhere within the park. This summary should give birders an idea of what to expect at Brazos Bend State Park. In the next few years, many species should be added to the park checklist of birds. As an example, the two Eared Grebes observed on the recent OG field trip represented a new sighting. Thus, the list now stands at 231! Not bad for an inland area without any salt-water contact! Visit the park after it opens and find a new species yourself. Good birding!! HOW TO BE A GOOD BIRDER, OR NEVER TURN YOUR BACK ON AN EMPIDONAX FLYCATCHER By T. Ben Feltner Improving your birding skills and becoming one r-Z the "hotshots" is not a matter of V_cK or inheritance. It is a condition brought about by selective birding practices and dedication. The following are some basic tenets that should help you improve your birdsmanship. (1) Get to know your local birds backwards and forwards and sideways. While rushing out to look at those beautiful spring warblers is great stuff, it actually does little to sharpen your skills. It is much more important to be able to identify an Orange-crowned Warbler in its several fall plumages complete with its nuances of non-field marks. Know as much as you can about the common birds around you. These are what you measure all else against. A female House Sparrow and an immature female Dickcissel at a winter feeder look remarkably alike. But if you know House Sparrows well, you would immediately pick out the Dickcissel, an excellent winter bird. This is the method by which Arlie McKay, the best local birder ever produced, consistently found "good" birds. He birded daily and really looked at all the birds around him. (2) Don't carry a field guide into the field. How many truly good birders do you see thumbing through book pages while studying a bird? This is not done to impress others, it is part of the mechanism of really learning birds. A novice, someone who has not yet identified and learned 200 or so birds, might be excused for toting a guide, but after a good basic core of species put your powers to work, not Peterson's. Do not be dismayed if you , cannot name every bird immediately. When you are confronted with something new. look at it, study it, make copious notes. You will end up knowing more about the bird than if you looked it up on the spot 50 times. Field guides will make you lazy. (3) Do study the field guides at all spare moments when not in the field. Carry one to your office and browse it through during breaks and at lunch. Keep a copy in the bathroom, one of the greatest of study areas. Turn off "Dallas" and thumb through the new Geographic Field Guide. It is not necessary to try to learn verbatim what the books say. Do not try to intensely learn every field mark for every bird, just browse. Constant exposure to knowledge through this means will insure that some will "rub off" eventually. As time goes on you will notice you can remember things you didn't even think you knew. (4) Associate with good birders as much as possible. Whenever you see a field trip is going to be led by a good birder, join it. Listen to the leader when he is pointing out field marks. Many times they are pointing out things that are not in the books. Bob Behrstock is particularly adept at that. If you don't understand why a certain bird has been identified as a such and such , ask. Most good birders are more than happy to explain. The speed with which you make identifications in the field is impressive only if you get them right. Watch Elric McHenry at work sometime. He very seldom makes rapid pronouncements; but he is one of the best birders in the area, and when he reports a rare bird, go look at it. It will be there.