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Tsar 4
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Seacon. Tsar 4 - Page 2. August 26, 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/938/show/933.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon. (August 26, 1979). Tsar 4 - Page 2. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/938/show/933

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Seacon, Tsar 4 - Page 2, August 26, 1979, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/938/show/933.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Tsar 4
Creator (Local)
  • Seacon
Date August 26, 1979
Description Issue 4 of TSAR, the daily newsletter for Seacon.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Science fiction
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Seacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Brighton, England
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 31
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5303
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f031_072_002.jpg
Transcript c TSAR4$ Sunday, 26-Aug~79 H Is for The September 9, 195'3? issue of FAN- TASY TIMES, a mimeographed newzine, deemed Phicon 2 "a dull success." Yet Philcon 2 originated the awards which have since become the highlight of annual worldcon programming. The Hugos have their genesis in controversy, and have seldom been without it during their existence. None of the early efforts to create awards for the field, such as the "Committee of Awards and Commendation for Meritorious Work in the Production of Science, Fantasy, and Weird Fiction," dated 1943, was able to overcome its critics to unify fans and pros behind a given awards concept. Four British fans, Leslie Flood, John Bcynon Harris, G. Ken Chapman, and Frank Cooper, did create the "Annual Award for Artistic Merit in Creative Fantasy," popularly called the International Fantasy Award, in 1951• There was no direct connection bctxfeen the IFA and the Hugos. The Hugos were markedly different in diversity of categories and method of selection. But it is interesting that the IFA trophy consisted of a spaceship 20 inches high, imitating the one on the Boncstell cover of the February,1951? GALAXY. There was one for fiction, chromiurn-platcd on an oak base, and one for nonfiction, bronzed on a mahogany base. The IFA rocket had stubby wings in addition to wide tailfins, and in a photo doesn't closely resemble later Hugos except that any chrome rocket on a plinth resembles any other. None of the available sources (see bibliography) state that the IFA (defunct after 1957) was a direct inspiration for the Hugo design, but perhaps readers of this newzine attending SeaCon can supply a definitive answer. The trophy is just about the only point of similarity botwrocn the two awards. Unlike the IFA, which was selected by an international panel of pros, the "Achievement Awards11 created by Philcon 2 were selected by popular vote of the membership. Voters' options were not limited in any way, Rocket Page 2 because the idea of a nominating ballot was not introduced until 1959* NTor did a large number of voters participate in the first Hugos, to judge by Warner's statement in WEALTH OF FABLE that no award was given in some of the planned categories (no short story award, for example). Consequently, early Hugo winners may have had only a fistful of votes in their favor, with the rest of the ballots spread all over creation. Orig£n?,l winners were? Willy Ley (cx-r cellence in Fact Articles), Philip Jose Farmer (Best Nov; SF Author or Artist), Forrest J. Ackerman (No. 1 Fan Personality), THE DEMOLISHED MAN (Best Novel), ASTOUNDING and GALAXY (tie for Best Professional Magazine), Virgil Finlay (Best Pro Artist). Philcon 2 neither adopted a nickname for its awards, nor described the trophy in its publications. Warner credits Bob Madle for naming the awards after Gernsback, and Hal Lynch for doing much of the spadework for the award idea. Philcon 2 expected succeeding committees to continue the awards — but the very next year's committee completely ignored them, and SFCon's publications never said why. It fell to the 1955 Clevention committee to revive the Hugos. Their PR 2 announced that they would keep the statuette design used by Philcon, the first indication that Philcon's awards had been rocket-shaped. nSpci,ce precludes telling you the entire story of how these Hugos came into being," PR 4 tantalizes historians, "but suffice it to say that during the process, two of the committee were nearly jailed, many heartbreaking setbacks were surmounted (these include both financial and technical ones) and that there were two or three times when the committee almost threw in the towel." A photo shows Horecn Falasca, co- chairman, holding the bulky award. The 1955 Hugos consisted of a %olid bronze, double-plated chrome rocket, 13«5 inches tall on a mahogany base 6.5 inches high — total weight nine pounds. The committee underwrote the (continued on page 3)