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The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program
Page 12
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World Fantasy Convention. The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 12. October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/891.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention. (October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978). The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 12. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/891

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention, The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 12, October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/891.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • World Fantasy Convention
Date October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978
Description A program book for the Fourth World Fantasy Convention.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • World Fantasy Convention
  • Austin, Alicia
  • Wilson, Gahan
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 38
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5310
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 12
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f038_124_013.jpg
Transcript s The central character of "Dark World" is Franz Kinzman, research psychologist and weird fiction writer. The sort of man who lives on the edge figuratively and literally. He has invited a couple of friends who share an interest in the outre' to his retreat in the Southern California hills, Rim House, perched precariously on the side of a mountain. These people are products: of the city, and in the city, the "hive," with "the clack of the mass media" so loud "that it's practically impossible to think or sense or feel anything deeply, anything that's beyond humanity." Their questing thoughts probably cause them no more than an occasional frisson; here in the lonely, spooky California mountains is the perfect place for an encounter with supernatural horror. Kinzman goes on to say, "It's hard to get out of the city, even in the wilderness." What actually occurs in this story is so weird it's hard to describe without a detailed synopsis, and it would be a shame to spoil the story for those who haven't read it. For those of us who are seekers of the unknown, it works as both an enticement and a warning. Another story that's as California as Linda Ronstadt and Jerry Brown is "The Man Who Made Friends with Electricity." A New Englander named Leverett rents a house in Southern California mainly because of the high tension pole outside the bedroom window, and the assurance of Mr Scott, the real estate agent, that there are no Communists living nearby. A few days later, Mr Scott visits his new tenant and finds him sitting under the buzzing pole. Leverett claims to hear voices in the electric hum; in fact electricity tells him things about where it goes. Mr Scott can live with this; after all, there are weirder things in Southern Cal, and Leverett seems relatively harmed. A few months go by and Leverett seems happy as a clam, but then something goes wrong. He finds out electricity, which he thought was "American and true," was actually on equal terms with the commies. And electricity is determined to stop any big war, even if the Americans are right. Leverett can't live with this, and threatens electricity, and tells it to "behave decent." A freak thunderstorm hits the area that night, with huge arcs of lightning flashing across the countryside. The next morning Leverett is found d.ead, with strands of electrical wiring wrapped around his pa jama leg. A,true technological fairy tale. In a much darker vein is "The Black Gondolier," the only story about oil paranoia I know of. "The Black Gondolier" takes place in Venice, California, a perfect town for ghost stories, being a sort of ghost town itself. This story is unusual for the time it was written (196^), showing an early awareness and anticipation of the power struggle over oil we are going through now. Also of interest is the delineation of the character of Daloway, the haunted outcast; and its obvious Lovecraft influence, down to the ending, with the last sentence in italics. Other California stories are "The Casket Demon," in which a Hollywood starlet's ancestral curse reduces her to nothingness, and "Schizo Jimmie," the basic premise of which is that modern witches are people who carry insanity; like Typhoid Mary, they are immune but can infect others. Also using Southern California as a setting is Leiber's recent novel, Our Lady of Darkness, a remarkable book that uses San Francisco at the turn of the century as well as the modern city. It is impossible to do justice to all the facets of this novel in so little space, so we'll have to settle for a few general comments. The story concerns another wierd fiction writer, Franz Weston, and 11