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The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program
Page 11
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World Fantasy Convention. The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 11. October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/890.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention. (October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978). The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 11. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/890

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention, The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 11, October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/890.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • World Fantasy Convention
Date October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978
Description A program book for the Fourth World Fantasy Convention.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • World Fantasy Convention
  • Austin, Alicia
  • Wilson, Gahan
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 38
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5310
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f038_124_012.jpg
Transcript a girl who appears in his office one day, strictly on speculation. When he maizes his rounds the next day, all his customers choose the girl to represent their products. Amazed, he rushes back to find her address, but can't find it. She shows up a few days later, tells him no one is to know her address or phone number. All photography must be done in the same room as the first session. Of course he accepts her conditions; he doesn't want to throw away a gold mine. Soon her picture is plastered all over the city, and he begins to wonder exactly what she's got0 He thinks: You know how modern advertising gets everybody's mind set in the same direction, wanting the same things, imagining the same things. And you know the psychologists aren't so sceptical of telepathy as they used to be. ''Add up the two ideas. Suppose the identical desires of millions of people focused on one telepathic person. Say a girl. Shaped her in their image. Imagine her knowing the innermost hungers of millions of men. Imagine her seeing deeper into those hungers than the people that had them, seeing the hatred and the wish for death behind the lust. Imagine her shaping herself in that complete image, keeping herself as aloof as marble. Yet imagine the hunger she might feel in answer to their hunger. There are a number of "mystery poisoner" murders; people found dead with nothing wrong — their hearts have simply stopped beating. He finally decides to follow her home; the mystery is too much for him. She stops in front of a store window with a picture of herself displayed. When a lone, middle-aged man walks up and looks in the window, she walks over and stands beside him. They get into a taxi and drive away. The next night she picks a billboard of herself to stand under. A guy drives by, backs up; she gets in, and the photographer sees the driver's face. The next morning the same face is in the papers, another victim of the poisoner. If you haven't read the story, read it. I'm not going to say what happens the next night when he takes her arm and walks her down the stairs. Something in the Southern California air brings out the weirdness in people; it has provided Leiber with inspiration for a number of his horror stories. As civilization moves ever westward, the strange beliefs and horrors of the east have followed. The massive entertainment industry in California can be said to have produced a number of horrors by itself. California is, as Leiber puts it, ". . • the home of the peach, the nut, and the prune•n In many ways Leiber has done for Southern Cal what H.P. Lovecraft did for New England. While he doesn't actually create a pantheon of evil elder gods (Neither did Lovecraft really; we have August Derleth and others to thank for that unfortunate condition) he has invested the landscape with a certain alien sense that both attracts and repels. Looking at Leiber as a regionalist writer, perhaps the story that most deserves attention is "A Bit of the Dark World." This serious tale of entropy speeded up is one of my personal favorites, as well as being one of the strangest things Leiber has written. When man rends the protective walls he has built up for centuries, he unleashes a horror, "The sort of horror that the whole fabric of civilization was designed to protect us from and to make us forget. The horror about which all man's learning tells us nothing." "Dark World" is about man's utter helplessness in the face of such horrors. i 10