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The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program
Page 10
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World Fantasy Convention. The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 10. October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/889.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention. (October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978). The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 10. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/889

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention, The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 10, October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/889.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • World Fantasy Convention
Date October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978
Description A program book for the Fourth World Fantasy Convention.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • World Fantasy Convention
  • Austin, Alicia
  • Wilson, Gahan
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 38
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5310
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f038_124_011.jpg
Transcript day, and every evening on the way home he studies a certain area of rooftops, "... a dingy, melancholy little world of tar-paper, tarred gravel, and smoky brick." One evening Wran notices a black, lumpy sack on a rooftop three buildings away. The next day it is one roof closer, and he begins to worry. On the third day, to his relief, the sack has disappeared. When he starts seeing sooty faces at his windows, he decides to see a psychiatrist. Pschoanalysis was fairly new to the public in 19^1 • and. it is to Leiber's credit he uses it merely as a story-telling device and not as an answer to Wran's problems. The visit to the psychiatrist's office lets us know a bit about Wran's background; here we learn about his childhood, and we learn he was a sensory prodigy who lost his powers at the age of eight during an experiment that discredited two young researchers. Wran stops his visits to the psychiatrist when the doctor himself sees "a negro voyeur" at the window. Leaving the doctor's office Wran is drawn downtown through the alien-seeming city streets to his office building, where he rides the elevator up to his floor. Sitting in his darkened office, the phone rings; his wife and child have been frightened by a bl&ck prowler. Wran tries to leave by the elevator but sees a black shape looking up at him from the floors below. Horrified, he runs back to his office and locks the door. Wran hears it coming up the elevator; then the light through the frosted glass door is blotted out. The door opens and his secretary enters. Wran realizes her "suitably vacuous" mind has indeed been taken over by the city ghost. He panics and runs for the roof— the appropriate place forthe encounter. On the roof, against a background of monolithic city structures, he has nowhere to go, and his transformed secretary backs him to the roof's edge. "Sacrifice? Worship? Or just fear?" Wran grovels at the edge of the abyss. "I will obey you. You are my god. You have supreme power over man and his animals and his machines. You rule this city and all others." Man has given in to his own creations. Some other stories of city fear aire "The Hound," in which a sensitive protagonist, much like Wran, is nearly destroyed by a city-spawned werewolf; "The Automatic Pistol," in which a gun acts as a witch's familiar; and "The Inheritance," which explores the will to murder that we all sup- posedly have deep inside us. "The Hound" is worth reading not only for the sake of the story, but also for one of the characters' monologues, which put Leiber's thoughts on the possible supernatural inhabitants of cities into a two page nutshell. While "The Automatic Pistol" is a lighter story than "The Hound," it delves rather deeply into the peculiar mystique surrounding guns. America didn't originate the gun, but we have done more toward popularizing them than almost anyone else, almost to the point of giving them life. "The Inheritance" is a weird tale about a young man who inherits two month's rent on an apartment where his recently deceased uncle lived. This story reminded me somewhat of H.H. Ewers "The Spider." It has the same feel about it; it sucks you into its dreary world. All of these stories were written in the forties, a period when American popular culture spread in leaps and bigger bounds than ever before. The science fiction field was much wider than the fantasy and weird fiction fields, and Leiber produced excellent science fiction for those markets. I feel, though, his horror fiction is ultimately more important, because it doesn't extrapolate some possible future, but deals with the way our culture is affecting us now. Take, for instance, "The Girl with the Hungry Eyes," a story which appeared in 19^9- A not-too-successful photographer takes some pictures of