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The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program
Page 6
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World Fantasy Convention. The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 6. October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/885.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention. (October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978). The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 6. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/885

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention, The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 6, October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/885.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • World Fantasy Convention
Date October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978
Description A program book for the Fourth World Fantasy Convention.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • World Fantasy Convention
  • Austin, Alicia
  • Wilson, Gahan
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 38
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5310
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f038_124_007.jpg
Transcript But for this definition of the weird tale to work and "be productive — that is, lead to the creation of artistically effective weird stories — the writer must have a reasonably clear idea of what is known in the universe and what is not, of what seems possible at the present time and what impossible, in order for him to be able to imagine the circumstances in which the impossible might happen or seem to happen and the shivery unknown seem to invade the known universe. Because, of course, in a universe where anything is easily possible, nothing is really wonderful or thrilling. And Lovecraft was, of course, that sort of critical and highly intelligent writer. He was no gullible champion of witchcraft, diabolism, and other brands of the occult, but rather the sceptical opposite. We trusted him to purvey for us genuinely weird fictions (the sort of things that if they happened would truly topple the current scientific outlook and confound intelligent scepticism) and not present us with a mishmash of cultish beliefs and refurbished superstitions and unevidenced reports of horrors and wonders. Yes, I believe that's the most important literary sense in which we trusted Lovecraft — and also the best of the other weird writers of his day, such as Machen, de la Mare, Kafka, Ewers, M.R. James, Blackwood. Wakefield, Bierce, Henry James, Cabell, Crawford, Chambers, etc. — to be themselves guarantors and touchstones for the fictional weirdities and wonders they created; when they handed us a new story, they were saying, "Reader, if this happened to me, I would be convinced that things are not as they seemn" We knew they loved the weird themselves and would never play fast and loose with it. And now what changes forty years have wrought! The bounds of the universe have been greatly widened, both so far as outer space and inner space are concerned. At the same time there's been a weakening of trust in authority, including scientific^authority, so "that there's come to be an overly easy acceptance of witchcraft and other cults, flying saucer reports, claims of telepathic and other psychic or psionic powers. This calls more than ever on the weird writer for critical intelligence, for a thoughtful mixture of openmindedness and scepticism, for a devotion to the truly weird as opposed to its flashy imitations (that is, a devotion to what would truly scare him rather than to what he thinks will scare ignorant and thrill eager readers). Today the writer has far greater freedom of expression; he is far less bound by censorship and taboos. Here the danger for the weird writer is that he may be tempted to become overly explicit at all times, he may strip the heroine and bind her to the rack and have her raped by a monster all on page one, he may forget the power of understatement and suggestion, he may omit to arouse the reader's imagination and make the reader's imagination work for him (something the reader always enjoys having happen). Today, also, markets for all sorts of fantasy writers have increased greatly in number and range and (for the most part) in the extent of financial rewards: paperback books, comic books, the new mixed-media phen omenon of the heavilly illustrated story, TV and film scripts. Just consider the fantasy novel. In Lovecraft's day that haxL pretty much to be hardcover publication or nothing. True, there were magazine serials, but they had to be a series of episodes with cliff-hanger openings and closes — really, a sequence of closely connected short stories rather than a novel. While now there's the whole field of the paperbacks, which prefer novels over collections of short stories.