Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program
Page 5
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
World Fantasy Convention. The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 5. October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/884.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention. (October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978). The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 5. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/884

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

World Fantasy Convention, The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program - Page 5, October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/907/show/884.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Fourth World Fantasy Convention, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • World Fantasy Convention
Date October 13, 1978 - October 15, 1978
Description A program book for the Fourth World Fantasy Convention.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • World Fantasy Convention
  • Austin, Alicia
  • Wilson, Gahan
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Fort Worth, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 38
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5310
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f038_124_006.jpg
Transcript They are wonderfully rich and energetic letters with no signs of his extreme ill health. Although he was to die of intestinal cancer and its complications on March 15, 1937> his January 27 missive to me says only: "For the past month I have been more or less on the semi-invalid list — with a recurrent winter malady manifested in swollen feet and ankles, plus a curiously persistent combination of intestinal indigestion and general weakness perhaps allied to the prevailing grippe. Not that I've been laid flat—indeed, I've managed to take regular walks for my health on warm days in a pair of cut and stretched old shoes, and have attended most of the recent college lectures on subjects as diverse as Peruvian antiquities, Italian Romanesque architecture, biological implications in philosophy, modern French painters , and Greek astronomical hypothoses. But I've had to rest frequently, and it has taken me a hell of a while to get anything done." In the same letter he found time to praise Howard: "R E H had a splendidly self-consistent world of prehistory mapped out for his Conan and Kull tales, and he made it vital and vivid. Have you seen the issues of the Phanta- graph containing Howard's own serial account of his legendarary lands—'The Hyborian Age'?" Really, he was such a good brave guy—praising my amateur illustrations for his "Whisperer in Darkness", sending our cats for Xmas a Dragonfly Press copy of his "Ulthar", urging me to send him anything I'd written ( a good two years before my own first sale), agreeing with most of m^ brash criticisms of his stories ( I shudder!), giving me free scholarly help whenever I hinted at an interest or a problem ( I told him I intended someday to write a Roman novel, and he sent me several closely-written pages of advice on researching that period for literary purposes, including a longer and a shorter list of useful books to read; Jonquil told him of our vague ambition to start a literary weird magazine — that got several pages of wise and somewhat disillusioning comment too), and arguing with me most courteously and pursuasively whenever he really differed from my views (I wrote him enthusiastically about the weird and wonderful material in Charles Fort's The Book of the Damned, Wild Talents, etc., and how Fort was bringing to light facts that science neglected or denied; he agreed with me that Fort was a good source of weird material for fiction writing or simple enjoyment, but. carefully explained to me at the same time why Fort's collections of weird newspaper clippings and other silly-season items (plus picturesque salty comment) did not constitute a refutation for science.) Pause there. . • for I realize that it gets us to the chief subject matter of this article. Lovecraft sought after the weird and wonderful because it thrilled him, gave him acute aesthetic pleasure, but his intellectual outlook was one of sceptical, scientific materialism, of scientific in- differentism, as he sometimes called it. He read and wrote weird stories because he could not find this sort of material readily available in the real world around him. What thrilled him was the thought of all the weird wonders and amazing surprises the mostly-^aiown great universe must hold. As he says in his Supernatural Horror in Literature: The one test of the really weird is simply this — whether or not there be excited in the reader a profound sense of dread, and of contact with unknown spheres and powers; a subtle attitude of awed listening, as if for the beating of black wings or the scratching of outside shapes and entities on the known universe's outmost rim. k