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36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two
Page 73
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Iguanacon. 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 73. August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/761.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Iguanacon. (August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978). 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 73. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/761

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Iguanacon, 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 73, August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/761.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two
Creator (Local)
  • Iguanacon
Date August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978
Description Program book for the 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon.
Donor Fritz Leiber; Justin Leiber
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction, American
  • Fantasy fiction, American
Subject.Topical (TGM-1)
  • Meetings
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz, 1910-1992
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Busby, F. M.
  • Nesvadba, Josef
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Bowers, Bill
  • Iguanacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Phoenix, Arizona
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 11
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 73
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f011_035_074.jpg
Transcript R-42 in Bin 401. They are so few. Never enough. But always a few to stand in the face of horror, to place their fragile bodies on the line for the rest of us. How they came to be born among us, these sanctified mutations, our children of wonder, perhaps we'll never understand. But they came when we needed them, and though they die for us, they do not die un- moumed. We consecrate our lives, our world, our future, to the holy memory of men and women like Alan Pryor. Paladins . . . guardians of the human race. QQ-42 in Bin 119. She bathed him and he slept. She thought he slept, but he only rested with his eyes closed. He watched her move around the conapt's misty interior, pruning and watering her bushes; watched her through slitted eyes. And when he was certain she was not in contact with anyone else, he sat up. Her back was to him. She was waxing the leaves of a bonsai. He sat up, naked in the misty pool of warm water, and he said, "You caused it." She did not turn. Her movements were precise and graceful. "I don't know what you mean," she said. But he knew she had caused it, and he said, "Yes, you do." The mist settled on v her hairless body and sparkled like frost. She ceased her activity and turned to him. "How could you do that?" He heard his voice; it sounded immature and bewildered. She sighed and shook her head very faintly, as though what he was saying was infintely saddening to her. Then the old paladin emerged from the mist and the shadows where he had been waiting, silently hoping this most sensitive of the sensitive children had not stumbled on the truth through the ineptitude of a judas on her first time out, knowing it was a futile hope, and prepared to do what had to be done. He was a very old paladin, who had been promised his freedom when he had prepared this woman to take over for him, and he was both furious at her midjudgement and desolate that his rest was that much further denied him. He stepped out of the shadows, slaughtered her with a thought, and turned to the young paladin in the mist pool. Alan Pryor looked into his face and saw what awaited him. He held up a hand. "At least let me understand why!" The old paladin sighed. Why not. "There are no attacks. It's all contrived." "No, that isn't so. l-A feel the pain ... I see the dar.kness coming through, the things, the spiracle ..." He shook his head. "All contrived. By sensitives like her, and me. We buy our lives. Judas sensitives. To keep you and others like you busy, for a cause. So we don't breed. So we don't multiply and take over. The ones who don't have the power, the non-sensitives, they knew from the first that we were the next step. They wouldn't let go; they'll never let go. So they contrived it all." Alan made a sudden lurch toward the edge of the mist-pool. The .old paladin burned him out; there was a wisp of dark, thin smoke from the ash-filled sockets that had been Alan Pryor's eyes; and the old paladin sighed once more before he began cataloging the parts of Alan Pryor's body that could be recycled in expectation of the next child born with the power. In that lonely place where Alan Pryor gave his life, there were no observers. - The attack came in an isolated, empty place where he was burned defending us. Now we lay his body to rest, with honor, swearing that he did not go un- mourned. With honor, to your final rest, Alan Pryor. Humanity will not forget. G-64in Bin 487. "There are no rules. Those who are in power make up the rules. So those out of favor are bound to break them." —Jose Ber Gel hard KENT BASH, illustrator of "The Executioner of the Malformed Children," is a Los Angeles-based artist whose work has been prominently displayed in museums and galleries throughout the world. His "California Suite" of paintings, fantastic examples of contemporary magic realism, have been lauded and collected by critics and devotees of fine art across the country. This is his second illustration of an Ellison story, the first having been commissioned by the author for "In the Fourth Year of the War," a fantasy that will appear in the forthcoming fifth issue of Gary Hoppenstand's Midnight Sun magazine. Robert Anton Wilson Bill Breiding Gary Farber Feb 16-18 1979 o OVS OUAKECO'V OUAKECON 540 CLAYTON ST. SAN FANCISCO, CA. 9 H I I 7 76 IGUANACON PROGRAM BOOK