Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
36th World Science Fiction Convention IguanaCon Two
Page 65
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
IguanaCon. 36th World Science Fiction Convention IguanaCon Two - Page 65. August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 6, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/753.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

IguanaCon. (August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978). 36th World Science Fiction Convention IguanaCon Two - Page 65. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/753

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

IguanaCon, 36th World Science Fiction Convention IguanaCon Two - Page 65, August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 6, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/753.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title 36th World Science Fiction Convention IguanaCon Two
Creator (Local)
  • IguanaCon
Date August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978
Description Program book for the 36th World Science Fiction Convention IguanaCon.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Busby, F. M.
  • Nesvadba, Josef
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Bowers, Bill
  • IguanaCon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Phoenix, Arizona
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 11
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5283
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 65
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f011_035_066.jpg
Transcript Fjadan elteon fiction Id q jugular xjetri There is a quicksilver quality to Ellison that bespeaks a rare and inquiring mind—a spontaneous creativity and undisciplined selectivity. John Barkham Review Harlan Ellison—as he is at some pains to tell us in an introduction from his latest book, Strange Wine, is completely upfront. You may take him at his word, for he is pulling your leg not a bit. Harlan is every ounce as violent, erudite, mind-blowing, and sensory-overloading as his breakneck prose; he is perfectly capable of pulling off the curse from David Bromberg's "Will Not Be Your Fool" and ten minutes later offering you the equivalent of his first-born son, neatly packaged and delivered by express mail. In short,,he is a phenomenon which cannot be described, but which must be experienced-which makes a pen portrait such as this seem futile . . . And yet, it is a tantalizing challenge: Ellison's fiction, television appearances, introductions, and critical writings compell one to think about him; it is impossible to ignore a force as elemental as that. The key word is "extravagant." Everything he does is extravagant, often vulgar: he is constantly in motion, as if even the—again, extravagant—outpouring of energy in his writing and endless social and business engagements leaves him fully-charged and alive—another good key word: Ellison is endlessly alive. The walls of his living room are crowded with artwork, geegaws, kinetics, books—thousands of books, of course, not the tasteful arrangement of a few, choice volumes. Things of all varieties perch on shelves and tables in a manner too chaotic and too blatantly sensual—as sensual as the furnishings themselves—to be merely baroque--the overall effect is finestkind rococo, singly and en mass. Walking into that room for the first time is like encountering Ellison for the first time in print: one suffers from sensory overload and comes away merely dazed. Nor is there contradiction in The Great Man's office—the desk itself is smoothly and sensuously functional, and immediately around it is a playground, starting with "adult" toys and winding up with yo-yos and a graffiti post. Harlan plays constantly—mind games with guests (he is the master of 237 separate and distinct Funny Voices), roles, roles—it is impossible to say which is the real Harlan Ellison—and constantly with his environment. Ellison Wonderland is a complete world, and it's not so strange that Harlan has found increasingly less need for fandom: his world is fandom as it should be, constantly stimulating and reacting to him. I think I solved part of the puzzle of Harlan Ellison within ten minutes of meeting him for the first time: he is a Dionysian intellectual, a tee-totalling Dionysios, sui generis. That's really strange—and that insight might go a long way toward explaining why almost everybody finds him incredibly hard to take: all of the rest of us are rather thoroughly Apollonian in our training, with Apollonian tastes and conditioned habits. Although there is a strong call to the Dionysian in our culture, it usually manifests itself in vitalism and nut-cult and low protestant religiosity ... a person who has taken great draughts of Western culture in an assimilated it thoroughly is supposed to be slightly cynical and emotionally cool—at least, so far as the standard role-models go. Almost everybody is unprepared to deal with a strongly passionate and strongly intellectual personality. I don't know of any better way to describe Harlan Ellison: strongly intellectual and strongly passionate. It's an intriguing combination—and one we might all do well to use as a role model. I liked the sequence of photographs on these pages and the preceding portfolio because they caught aspects of Harlan which are only rarely seen in publicity photos—wit and humor, even exhaustion, serious intensity in conversation. Informality. I knew they had to be there. "Bleeding Stones" and 'The Chocolate Alphabet" don't 68 IGUANACON PROGRAM BOOK