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36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two
Page 52
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Iguanacon. 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 52. August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/740.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Iguanacon. (August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978). 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 52. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/740

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Iguanacon, 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 52, August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/740.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two
Creator (Local)
  • Iguanacon
Date August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978
Description Program book for the 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon.
Donor Fritz Leiber; Justin Leiber
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction, American
  • Fantasy fiction, American
Subject.Topical (TGM-1)
  • Meetings
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz, 1910-1992
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Busby, F. M.
  • Nesvadba, Josef
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Bowers, Bill
  • Iguanacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Phoenix, Arizona
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 11
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 52
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f011_035_053.jpg
Transcript Years ago, Sam Moskowitz once remarked to Buz that from twenty feet away he looked like Robert Heinlein, to which Buz replied that if from twenty feet away he could write like Robert Heinlein, he'd build extensions on his typewriter keys. At point-blank range, however, he writes remarkably like F.M. Busby; this phenomenon is unique. Who else, for instance, would—or could—perpetrate a tender sensitive love story about necrophilia? ("Tell Me All About Yourself", New Dimensions 3, ed. by Silverberg, and reprinted in Best SF Of The Year no. 3, ed. by Carr.) Buz was born in Indianapolis of human parents; overcoming this handicap, he became what he is today, whatever that may be. He wrote his first "story" at the tender age of seven. One page long, it had three humans plus the title character, who was a rosebush. An early tendency toward New Wave? Driven from Indiana, no doubt by torch-bearing peasants, he and his family settled in Eastern Washington. During his misspent—or carefully- invested—youth, he was an anchorman on the high school debate team; he did rather well by inventing references during rebuttal, when nobody had time to check up. He appeared in one high- school play and swore off greasepaint forever; he also built (and crashed) a hang glider. His college career at Washington State in Pullman stretched over nine years, because the Army kept coming after him; once he served in the Infantry and once, during World War II, he was in the Signal Corps on Amchitka Island in the Aleutians. The fact that Buz became, in time, very bugged at that rock has absolutely nothing to do with its subsequent destruction in an atomic test. It says here. When the world was once again Made Safe For Democracy he returned to college and majored in Electrical/Electronic Engineering, with a brief sojourn into Physics. His transcript reads, on two subsequent lines, "Dropped, poor scholarship" and "Graduated with Honors." There must be a story there someplace... It is traditional for writers to work at many peculiar jobs; while in college Buz was no exception. He was a janitor (frequently fired); he mowed lawns, worked in libraries, drove a variety of trucks and a cab, tended bar while he was underage, was a bakery assistant, worked on a survey crew, and chipped mortar off used bricks for a whole month. This was not, he insists, on a prison rockpile. When not actually attending class he also raised quite a respectable amount of mayhem. When the college, in despair, graduated him, Buz took a job with Alaska Communications, where he remained until 1970. At that time the government f. M. BVISBU f. M. BMSBU sold the outfit to RCA; Buz opted for early retirement and sat down before the typewriter. He'd garnered his first SF rejection slip in 1947 from John Campbell; it was, he claims, richly deserved. In 1956-57 he sold a story to Doc Lowndes. He knew this because he found Future Science Fiction with his story on the stands; eventually he even got paid. These forays into professional writing were sporadic, however, and most of his literary energy was concentrated on fandom. He was co-editor of Cry, which won a Hugo in 1959, and belonged (still does) to several Amateur Press Associations. With no further excuse for procrastination he found himself facing the typer in 1970. He looked at it; it looked back. He produced a book that, well... Fortunately, in 1971 Vonda N. Mc- Intyre organized a Clarion-West workshop at the University of Washington and insisted Buz attend; he remains eternally in her debt. Six weeks of high- pressure hell and creativity, the Clarion experience cuts years from the learning process of those who survive (and, it's rumored, cuts years from the lifespans of those less-dedicated and fortunate). Buz is tough. He lived, learned, and bravely returned in 1972 for another dose of medicine. Between the two workshops he began to Sell. He has, since, been doing that a lot: around 30 items shorter than book length, ranging from short-shorts to novellas. His first novel, Cage A Man, had lobsters on the cover of every edition but the French (vive la France!). This is ascri- bable to a chance remark made by Barton, the protagonist, while referring to the alien Demu. Buz swears that never again will he use Earth-animal metaphors; no point in giving the artists a running start! (When the book was published we of the Expository Lump- Seattle's ongoing Clarion-type critique group—crowned him with a laurel group—crowned him with a laurel wreath, poured champagne, and gave him a large plastic bib decorated with— yes—a lobster, and the words "To Serve Demu.") Hand the man a piece of lobster art, and stand well back. Cage A Man's sequel, The Proud Enemy, had purple lobsters on the cover. Thus, at a Thing Dinner (a strange sf food potluck tradition among some of us Seattle types) we served Buz a purple lobster. It's not difficult. Blue food coloring mixed with vinegar soaks nicely into the shell. Eluding clutching crustacean claws, Buz proceeded to write Rissa Kerguelen, which was first published in hardcover in two volumes, Rissa Kerguelen and The Long View. In paperback it was reunited as originally intended. There were no lobsters on the cover. Buz admits the book has flaws, but he still loves it a lot. So do I. If you disagree to any great extent, avoid Buz after midnight, when his fangs begin to grow. Books not yet in print (July 1977) are All These Earths, from an idea conceived in Anchorage, Alaska in 1954—it should be published before Iguanacon. Next comes Zelde M'Tana. Zelde is a character in Rissa, but her unusual and vivid early life demanded a book of its own. A suspense novel is now in progress; Buz hopes it will be ancient history by Iguanacon. Then, lest the lobster industry perish, there's the idea for a third Barton book—and—and— That typewriter Buz confronted in 1970 did indeed get hot. What's Buz like? He won't get up in the mornings. His printable vices include tobacco and alcohol; his printed vices are listed above. (He refuses to discuss whether he researched "Tell Me All About Yourself".) He tells wild and amusing stories, many of them true. He keeps a cat, Ms. Kitty, as is right and just. He cannot boil water without scorching it. He is married to Elinor Busby, a prolific fan-writer. Her patience and forbearance should be an inspiration to us all. Sometimes Buz fixes cars in emergencies. He is helpful and loyal to his friends. He hates to wait. Buz has a bit of a quick temper. He has strong negative reactions toward such things as Ray Palmer's "Shaver Mystery," followers of Velikowsky and von Daniken, all pseudo-occult books, and SF writers who can't count. When he hears the term "sci-fi" he breaks out in hives-complete with bees. You have been warned. by Bubbles Bcoxon IGUANACON PROGRAM BOOK