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36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two
Page 14
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Iguanacon. 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 14. August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/702.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Iguanacon. (August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978). 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 14. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/702

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Iguanacon, 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 14, August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/702.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two
Creator (Local)
  • Iguanacon
Date August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978
Description Program book for the 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon.
Donor Fritz Leiber; Justin Leiber
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction, American
  • Fantasy fiction, American
Subject.Topical (TGM-1)
  • Meetings
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz, 1910-1992
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Busby, F. M.
  • Nesvadba, Josef
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Bowers, Bill
  • Iguanacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Phoenix, Arizona
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 11
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f011_035_015.jpg
Transcript and Dr, entile ing nic ds. cer the rv ire ng to lei >ut :ed ike ter es- >m itz rs, •re re- ir- >le or :e, it »n. as us ty ne :t- ce ic to Id to it c- es al t, i- o i- d is 1- r- ►f d o e erage horror stuff until the end, when the rampage of Wilbur's inhuman brother more than makes up for the rest. The son of Yog-Sothoth is presented as an irresis- table elemental force through some extremely effective special effects and editing. Lovecraft would have approved, no matter what he may have thought of the rest. (1970; directed by Daniel Haller, starring Sandra Dee, Dean Stock- well, and Sam Jaffe). The Shuttered Room I have to confess that I've never seen this film, and so cannot vouch for its quality. The source is one of the more respectable Derleth "posthumous" collaborations with Lovecraft's notes and fragments, rather than an actual story by Lovecraft. From the very little written about it, the film is apparently quite watered down from that. However, the setting, in the midst of a ghostly English moor, sounds appropriately Lovecraftian, and the cast is excellent. (1966; directed by David Greene, starring Gig Young, Carol Lynley, Oliver Reed). Haunted Palace Poe's poem 'The Haunted Palace" is superimposed as a prologue to this film of the same name, and there any connection ends. Officially, this is the motion- picture version of Lovecraft's novella The Case of Charles Dexter Ward. In reality, it uses little but the main character's name (aging him from Lovedraft's high- school student to a middle-aged Vincent Price) and the return of look-alike ancestral sorcerer Joseph Curwin. The new plot (combining possession with demonism) is pure Corman/Matheson. Yet, while less true to Lovecraft's storyline than the later adaptations, it is probably the most "Lovecraftian" of the series. Matheson has moved the action from Providence to HPL's invented, and perhaps better- known, small town of Arkham, Mass., and introduced strong elements of the Cthulhu Mythos absent in the original. The Corman Arkham is more reminiscent of Dunwich, haunted by shambling, eyeless degenerates and reeking of lotahsome terrors that luck behind every ominous shadow or crumbling hovel. Inside the ill-reputed Curwin mansion (note the set designs by director-to-be Daniel Haller), Corman lets loose with his customary flair for mounting suspense and baroque horror, right up to a terrific conjuration of the Ancient Ones (la Cthulhu!). This is a real tour-deforce, the best of the Lovecraft adaptations, and the best of the AIP "Poe" series, despite a predictable ending. (1963; directed by Roger Corman, screenplay by Charles Beaumont, starring Vincent Price, Debra Paget, Lon Chaney Jr.). Man in Outer Space Things to Come Wild in the Streets Sunday: Doc Savage Producer, director, and special- effects innovator George Pal is deservedly something of a legend: more than any other film artist, he has devoted his career to the fantastic cinema, and few of his works could not be called classics of the field. In Doc Savage, his most recent (and perhaps last) film, he pays tribute to the American Superhero. Funny, exciting, boasting some otherworldly effects (watch out for the electric flying snakes), it's one serious flaw is never making up its mind whether to be satire or straight adventure. It died in general release (poor George ... he was ready to do a string of sequels, then retire to a Doc Savage tv series), but seems to have found its niche as a fannish cult classic. Keep an eye out for that famous line, "Mona - you're a brick!" Fearless Frank Before and even a little while after making his mark with Midnight Cowboy, Jon Voight appeared in a slew of obscure, offbeat, and outright underground films, frequently under the direction of Paul Williams (of Phantom of the Paradise fame). This is one of his greatest and strangest efforts: he plays Frank, a hero being slowly corrupted by his own growing arrogance, and an android double, created by the Evial Mad Scientist, who slowly learns humanity. The twists of this plot are definitely unorthodox, and the characters something more than eccentric. The style of the film is at once camp and surreal, transcending both categories. If ever a film deserved a fannish following, this is- it; perhaps fandom will discover this film at Iggy.; Man In Outer Space This is an extremely rare Czech comedy about a sleazy janitor who is trapped in an experimental spacecraft on lift-off, and returns to Earth centuries later after the establishment of a benign Marxist Utopia. Optimistic future-worlds are rare enough in science fiction; in SF films they are virtually non-existant. I probably remember this as being better than it really is, but nonetheless, this is a very funny film, and a unique view of Things to Come. Ignore the low-budget sets and special effects and some low gags and enjoy. Alphaville Generally considered one of the least important of Godard's films by highbrow critics, Alphaville is probably his most watghable by anyone else. The plot is that of an overly-familiar espionage/space opera: secret agent Lemmy Caution (played by Eddy Constantine) goes to Alphaville, "Capitol city of a distant computer," to rescue the missing scientist. He encounters violence and intrigue, fights the tyrant computer Alpha 60, and in the end gets the girl. Alphaville, however, bears no resemblance to Buck Rogers and Star Wars: Godard is slumming in genre cinema, and his space opera is half satire, half tribute to pop culture. The time is definitely the future, and the setting is definitely another world, but the style is more film noire than Flash Gordon. Moon Zero Two Destination: Moon Dark Star The Films of Herbert Jean De Grasse In San Francisco, home of some of America's strangest underground filmmakers, Herb deGrasse is one of the strangest. He has an evial black humor that transcends the grotesque or even the fannish -- it is simply fiendish. His works are chaotic, sexy, irrational - frequently difficult - and darkly funny. There are vampires lurking amidst the '60s flower children, singing priests who beat up all sinners, the Starving Hordes of India knocking at your door, and God wearing a super-hero costume. These films pop up occasionally at festivals and in the 15 cities carrying the Presidio Theatre's "Midnight Movies" series, but this will be the first time several have been collected in one place (though they will be distributed throughout the regular program) at one time. We will definitely have his award-winning Organic Vampire and Two Films I Never Made (advertised in the Midnight Movies schedule as "Two of the funniest films Herb never made"), at least two features, and more. This may be your last chance to learn the true meaning of that insidious chant, "Ya-ya, Ye-ye." See the daily schedule for more info. Convention programmers take note: because we want to encourage our independent filmmakers, we are running Herb's address below: write him for a full list of his available films. Herbert Jean de Grasse Snow Leopard Films 355 Fair Oaks San Francisco, Calif. 94110 LOVECRAFT ON FILM It would be pertinent here to say a few words about the translation of the works of H. P. Lovecraft into film. A large bloc of the films shown Saturday afternoon. There is little need to sing the dark praises of H. P. Lovecraft here (as posthumous Guest of Honor, there is a written appreciation of his work elsewhere in this book). Perhaps the consummate artist of horror literature, Lovecraft's visions of cosmic wonder and mouldering, lurking (to say nothing of eldritch) terrors have been a major influence for a generation now in the fields of horror and fantasy. While Lovecraft's rich and idio- IGUANACON PROGRAM BOOK 13