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36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two
Page 13
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Iguanacon. 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 13. August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/701.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Iguanacon. (August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978). 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 13. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/701

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Iguanacon, 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 13, August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/701.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two
Creator (Local)
  • Iguanacon
Date August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978
Description Program book for the 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon.
Donor Fritz Leiber; Justin Leiber
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction, American
  • Fantasy fiction, American
Subject.Topical (TGM-1)
  • Meetings
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz, 1910-1992
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Busby, F. M.
  • Nesvadba, Josef
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Bowers, Bill
  • Iguanacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Phoenix, Arizona
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 11
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f011_035_014.jpg
Transcript aging as he expends his magickal energies in his running fight with Sinbad. Note the influence of the then-fading martial arts craze on the balletic fight scenes (particularly against the multi-armed Kali) and the perhaps-unintentionally hilarious Kung Fu-inspired bits of wisdom scattered through the dialogue. (1977; starring John Phillip Law, Tom Baker). Ugetsu Thief of Baghdad The Hobbit Saturday: Metropolis Fritz Lang pioneered several film genres-to-be; in Metropolis, he established the pattern for all the dehumanized dystopian "Future Society" films to follow. Predating modern computer technology and the crystallization of mind control through drugs, advertising, or whatever as a major tool of autocratic forces, Lang's pessimistic extrapolation is based on the advent of automation and the greater industrialization he saw. The lower classes are slaves to the machines of their vast factories, quite literally cogs in the workings of the system. While the hardware, acting and script are amusingly outdated (culminating in a silly happy resolution), Lang's directoral brilliance is at its best. Looked at on a*metaphoric level, Metropolis remains one of the most effective films of its sub-genre. The imagery, from vast city-scapes to the Inferno-like factory to Dr. Rotwang's semi-alchemical Mad Scientist's lab is unrivaled in later, more down-to-earth cinema. (1926; directed by Fritz Lang). 1984 Although this adaptation of George Orwell's grim vision of the near-future was not well-loved by the critics, my memory of it is of a properly realistic drama of the world as it may soon be ... if not quite as soon as 1984. The film lacks the book's more spectacular scenes, but is faitful to its version of an insidious dystopia. There are supposedly two endings to this film in existence: one, a heroic-romantic cop-out in which the two lovers defy the State to the end, dying hand-in-hand in the blowing leaves; the other (which I saw, although it's the supposedly rarer version) is chilling and* cynical, truer to Orwell's pessimism. Gladiators The idea of gladiatorial games replacing war as a release for hostilities once the world-state is established fascinates SF filmmakers. There was Deathrace, in which it was an extended bad joke, and Hugo-nominated Rollerball, in which The Game was grittily realistic, but in which the worst sort of SF was displayed . . . the kind where characters say, "As you know, our current dystopian society was established in the year 1990, when . . . ' Anyway, Gladiators is far superior to either of these, but never received half the bookings. I'm not aware of it ever having had a general release in the U. S., even. The teams in the arena, monitored for world-wide TV, are soldiers from the planet's outdated armies. To win, they must fight each other and the traps of a deadly obstacle course. One could well make a case for this film being an extrapolation of the Dungeons and Dragons craze taken to its Swiftian extreme. There are two new elements in this tournament: a young radical is independently making his way to the Game's "nerve center" (read "Dungeonmaster"), determined to destroy it, and a man and woman, from two opposing teams, are destined to fall in love. Guess which is the real threat? There are holes in the premise, but as a whole the film is very original and convincing in its presentation. THX-1138 No matter how much one may enjoy American Graffiti and Star Wars, it is hard to deny that each is more conventional than the one before it. This first feature effort (expanded from a short made as a film student at USC) is his one truly innovative film, the most complex and original work of a mediocrity-bound career. The future world of THX (the character played by Robert Duvall) is an antiseptic, white-on-white consumer- ist autocracy, probably the most thoroughly dehumanized in the science- fiction cinema. Were this film non- fiction, one would call the style semi- documentary; Lucas' exposition of his future dystopia is extremely sophisticated and clever, hinting at more than it explicitly reveals. Star Wars junkies will be interested in watching the motifs that reappeared in the later space-opera: the "pain staffs" of the robot police emit the same sound as Jedi "light sabres," the Jawas are foreshadowed by the diminutive "shell-dwellers" of the underground world's outer regions. The editing of the exciting escape-chase (shot in San Francisco's then-under-construc- tion BART tunnel) sequence is identical to that of the attack on the Death Star. Also, note the prevalence of robots, and the teaming of the protagonist with a larger, n on-human ally. (1971; directed by George Lucas, starring Robert Duvall, Donald Pleasance, Maggie McOmie). Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb Hugo winner for "Best Dramatic Presentation" in 1964 and a classic in its own right, Stanley Kubrick's epic black comedy about the end of the world needs little introduction. Watch for Peter Sellers in the role(s) of Group Captain Lionel Mandrake, President Merkin Muffley, and his properly mad former Nazi advisor, Dr. Strangelove. The Bed-Sitting Room Although not filmed as such, Richard Lester's equally black comedy is the logical sequel to Dr. Strangelove, picking up immediately after the grand atomic holocaust with which the first film ends. The BBC is now a bedraggled announcer wandering door-to-door, anchoring the news from the burnt-out frames of TV sets. The Queen and the Royal Family are gone, so the new national anthem, sung in honor of the closest surviving heir to the throne is "God Save Mrs. Ethel Shroke." There are no BEM mutants, but the rubble-strewn landscape is populated by equally weird sorts, including Spike Mulligan, Marty Feldman, and Peter Cook and Dudley Moore. Richard Lester is known for his direction from Help, A Hard Day *s Nigh t, The R itz and The Three and Four Musketeers, this is unquestionably his most bizarre and manic farce. This double feature of Dr. Strangelove and The Bed-Sitting Room is guaranteed to put Armageddon into a whole new perspective for you. Die, Monster, Die Some say this is a decent horror film bearing no resemblance to its source, The Colour Out of Space. Others call it boring, but a reasonable adaptation. Basically, screenwriter Jerry Sohl has turned Lovecraft's very mysterious "colour" from space into garden-variety radiation, and this is usually taken as one of the film's worst transgressions. Objectively speaking, Colour Out of Spaa seems one of Lovecraft's least cinematic stories -- a strange choice to attempt to film - and certainly not one that would lend itself to literal interpretation, to say nothing of the difficulties inherent in inventing a new color for motion pictures. As it is, Die, Monster, Die does follow the original story-line, in a general sort of way. That is, general enough that, while recognizable, the best fun in watching the film is catching the similarities to the story, which seem almost coincidental. There is some effective suspense and nice weirdness; and Boris Karloff is, as ever, in excellent form as the tainted patriarch. Appropriately enough for a character in a Loyecraft film, the career of protagonist Nick Adams degenerated to playing token Americans in Toho giant lizard flicks from here and he ultimately committed suicide. The Dunwich Horror Lovecraft's story is here modernized and greatly defantasized into a sort of Crhulhuian Rosemary's Baby, with Dean Stockwell's wholly human Wilbur Whatley seeking to bring about Yog- Sothoth's child through Sandra Dee. Av- ei ra m o\ ta tr e< n< tr H w IGUANACON PROGRAM BOOK