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36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two
Page 12
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Iguanacon. 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 12. August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/700.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Iguanacon. (August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978). 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 12. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/700

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Iguanacon, 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two - Page 12, August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/815/show/700.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon Two
Creator (Local)
  • Iguanacon
Date August 30, 1978 - September 4, 1978
Description Program book for the 36th World Science Fiction Convention Iguanacon.
Donor Fritz Leiber; Justin Leiber
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction, American
  • Fantasy fiction, American
Subject.Topical (TGM-1)
  • Meetings
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz, 1910-1992
  • Ellison, Harlan
  • Busby, F. M.
  • Nesvadba, Josef
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Bowers, Bill
  • Iguanacon
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Phoenix, Arizona
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 11
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 12
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f011_035_013.jpg
Transcript FFILMS As you may or may not have noticed, IguanaCon has had some problems in its two years of preparation. One of these has been its development into a rather low-budget Worldcon with - unfortunately - a correspondingly low- budget film program. If the schedule we are finally presenting is noticeably less transplendent than the one described in the Progress Reports, you may assume that having less than a third of my original working budget has someting to do with it. We have, however, assembled for your amusement and edification what I feel is a fairly interesting cross-section of different filmmakers' approaches to the fantastic and stfnal cinema. The schedule will undergo some changes between the time I write this and the con itself, but the following approximation should serve to give you generally a fair idea of what's going on each day. For exact showtimes and titles at the convention itself, consult the schedules that will be posted outside the film room and at the registration table. Wednesday: Dinosaurus That this movie would be the first film shown at IguanaCon was the one mandatory provision of my serving as Film Programmer. It isn't actually a good movie (in fact, it typifies all that was putrid in the '50s Giant Monster genre), but it was the very first one I ever saw. Its main characters (besides the stock Hero, Romantic Interest, Villain and Cute Kid) are a Neanderthal Man, a Brontosaurus, and a Tyrannosaurus Rex. All are exhumed on a 20th Century tropical isle and revived by lightning. If looked at correctly, their subsequent experiences represent a study in future shock, a representative conflict between primitive and modern culture. Each of the three characters represents an aspect of the unspoiled man. Against the alien culture, its Social Instinct (the Neanderthal) dies heroically (ironically, in an attempt to save the villain); its gentle side (the Brontosaurus) gives way to its inherent savagery (the -, Tyrannosaurus) which is in turn defeated by The System. All this is pure bullshit, of course, but the climactic fight between dinosaur and steam-shovel is rather nifty. Dinosaurus is notable for having provided stock shots to Twilight Zone's "The, Odyssey of Flight 33" episode and to John Landis' Schlock (the movie theater scene). Five Million Years to Earth Based on the BBC serial Quatermass and the Pit, this is third^and last in Hammer's series about the Van Helsing of space science. It is also perhaps the one motion picture ever to capture the exhilarating and awesome sense of discovery inherent in the best of hard SF. Beginning with the exhumation of a spacecraft in a London construction site and continuing through a series of discoveries that shake our most basic assumptions about who and what we are, and which lead to a climax more cathartic than Star Wars*, Five Million Years to Earth is pure science fiction at its full potential. This Island Earth The Monitors The Day the Earth Stood Still Thursday: His Majesty the Scarecrow of Oz One of the two (known) silent Oz films (the other was an adaptation of Wizard of Oz, starring Stan Laurel), this one was written and produced by L. Frank Baum himself. It was, for its time, quite a mammoth production, originally released in hand-tinted color. It was reasonably successful, but its production costs were so vast that it never had a chance of breaking even. It is now an extremely rare film; this may well be your one chance to see it. 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T Written by Dr. Suess, this amazing fantasy is rapidly cultivating the loyal cult following it richly deserves. Hans Conrid plays Dr. Towiliker, as diabolical a villain as one could hope for, with his sinister scheme to enslave 500 young boys at the keyboard of the world's most humongous piano. The sets, characters, songs, and action are pure Suess; definitely one of the most delightful surrealist comedies ever made. The Lorax This was the last of the series of televised Dr. Suess specials begun by How the Grinch Stole Christmas. The only one written by Suess for TV, it is clearly the best of the series, as well as one of the master's most imaginative tales. The cartoon animation is exquisite, the songs . . . well, the songs aren't as sickening as they were in the rest of the series. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Financed by a group of Salt Lake City investors who had gotten rich on four-walled nature flicks, this adaptation of the Carroll classic has had very little distribution. Being live action, it is predictably less fantastical than the well- known Disney cartoon. At the same time, it very nicely captures the perverse unreality of its source. While not being as totally removed from reality as a cartoon usually is, it actually achieves a level of surreality every bit as effective, with very fine sets, costumes, and well-known character actors in small, nutty parts. You won't recognize him, but Peter Sellers appears as the March Hare. The Wizard of Oz The Point Alacazam the Great Yellow Submarine Friday.- Peer Gynt This classic heroic quest story was originally an epic poem made into a play by Henrik Ibsen with incidental music by Grieg. This film adaptation combines elements from each of these sources. It is also of note as the screen debut of that constant denizen of SF and fantasy movies, Charleton Heston playing the young adventurer of the title. He likes to call it an "underground" movie; it isn't, really, but is quite experimental and unusual in its approach. A very different heroic fantasy. Siegfried The title character is for Northern Europe what Ulysses and Hercules are for the Mediterranean. While ostensibly based on Wagner's Niebelungen, Fritz Lang's version harkens back to the original, more barbaric folklore cycle. UFA, in Germany, had the world's largest silent studio -- the monumental Metropolis sets were constructed on its stages - but this epic fantasy was so huge it had to be shot outdoors. Still, the Germans, accustomed to absolute control over their images in the studio, used painted rocks and artificial trees in natural locations - a most unique effect. This film, the first of two parts, is rich with demons, dragons, magic and mayhem. Golden Voyage of Sin bad This is my personal favorite of Ray Harryhausen's Sinbad trilogy. It is the only one with an authentic Eastern flavor; certainly J. P. Law is the only Sinbad who seems to originate outside of Southern California. The special effects are probably the finest and certainly the most imaginative in Harryhausen's illustrious career. But in my opinion they are superseded by the incredible settings, suggestive of a period between eras, when the palaces of the gods are falling into ruin and are overrun with strange and primitive peoples. Tom Baker, who seems to be making a career of playing bizarre characters (he was Rasputin in Nicholas and Alexandra, Lynch in Mutations, and currently plays Dr. Who for the BBC), steals the show as the Evial Wizard. With a rare touch of originality, he is rapidly IGUANACON PROGRAM BOOK 11