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Westercon 36
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West Coast Science Fantasy Conference. Westercon 36 - Page 71. July 1, 1983 - July 4, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/677/show/654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

West Coast Science Fantasy Conference. (July 1, 1983 - July 4, 1983). Westercon 36 - Page 71. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/677/show/654

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

West Coast Science Fantasy Conference, Westercon 36 - Page 71, July 1, 1983 - July 4, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/677/show/654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Westercon 36
Creator (LCNAF)
  • West Coast Science Fantasy Conference
Date July 1, 1983 - July 4, 1983
Description A program book for Wetsercon 36/Westerchron.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • West Coast Science Fantasy Conference
  • Tenn, William
  • Austin, Alicia
  • Knight, Damon
Subject.Name (Local)
  • West Coast Science Fantasy Conference
  • Whitmore, Tom
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • San Jose, California
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 34
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5306
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 71
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f034_092_073.jpg
Transcript suits with a five-day life support system, others consist of lots of jewelry, lots of body paint, and not much else. Whatever, the outfit is probably being worn for you to look at. So look... but don't touch. Touching someone with whom you are not on touching terms is a fannish faux pas (or paw). Besides, fingerprints really mess up body paint. A costume might give you a good excuse to strike up a conversation with the wearer, but comments like "Wow! I really like the way your glornen glomz4 hang out!" are not likely to win you friends. On the other hand, if you are one of those fen who like to wear the above- mentioned strange garb, funny clothes, or weird costumes, you should expect some people to notice. Even if your motive for your outfit is simple comfort, if it's out of the ordinary, and especially if it's attractive or skimpy, you will collect some eyetracks. Accept that attention as the compliment it is, or go change into something less noticeable. WEAPONS POLICY Some of those fennish costumes include weapons, real or prop, Because of problems which have arisen at the interface between the mundane world and fandom, many convention committees have established a "weapons policy". (Westerchron's is clearly stated elsewhere in this program book.) Whatever that policy is (and however silly or unnecessary you may think it is) respect it while at that con. We've all got to play by the same rules, especially where potentially or apparently dangerous artifacts are concerned. Even if you are at a. con that doesn't have a weapons policy, common sense should tell you not to swing swords around wildly, play mumbletypeg in crowded rooms, or point blasters at innocent bystanders (who may not know that they are "only toys"). Likewise, a little reflection should show that grabbing a weapon from someone's belt is likely to be considered by that person as a hostile move. NAME TAGS/MEMBERSHIP BADGES Some fen think name tags are neat. They wear several dozen pinned about their persons. Some fen think name badges are a drag (they stick you; they get in the way of hugging old friends; they don't match your costume). Whichever kind of fan you become, wear your membership badge! Badges allow the convention to limit access to convention activities to members of the convention. It is an unfortunate fact of modern life that cons are expensive to run, what with renting the space, stocking the con suite with soda and beer, putting up the guest(s) of honor and all. You paid for your membership, and it wouldn't be fair if others snuck in without doing so, would it? A membership badge helps the gofer (see glossary) at the door of the Dealers' Room, art show, programming, con suite, movies or whatever know that you are One Of Us. Another important reason to wear you membership badge is that it helps perpetuate the feeling that fandom is all one big family/clan/tribe. A readable name tag lets other fen know who you are, and this helps them overlook little details like the fact that you may never have met before, or that you last met at 3 am in a smoke-filled party room, and you're all a little hazy about names. 4. A fannish term I just invented. Substitute whatever body part(s) your gender, orientation and grossness level suggests. 72 WESTERCHRON