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Westercon 36
Page 8
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West Coast Science Fantasy Conference. Westercon 36 - Page 8. July 1, 1983 - July 4, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/677/show/591.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

West Coast Science Fantasy Conference. (July 1, 1983 - July 4, 1983). Westercon 36 - Page 8. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/677/show/591

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

West Coast Science Fantasy Conference, Westercon 36 - Page 8, July 1, 1983 - July 4, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/677/show/591.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Westercon 36
Creator (LCNAF)
  • West Coast Science Fantasy Conference
Date July 1, 1983 - July 4, 1983
Description A program book for Wetsercon 36/Westerchron.
Donor Fritz Leiber; Justin Leiber
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction, American
  • Fantasy fiction, American
Subject.Topical (TGM-1)
  • Meetings
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz, 1910-1992
  • West Coast Science Fantasy Conference
  • Tenn, William, 1920-2010
  • Austin, Alicia
  • Knight, Damon, 1922-2002
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Westercon
  • Westerchron
  • Whitmore, Tom
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • San Jose, California
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 34
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5306
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f034_092_010.jpg
Transcript a—i &&$£* xpg; PHIL KLASS (WILLIAM TEHQIT) TWo Appreciations by Debbie Notkin You may have noticed from convention fliers that this Westercon's professional guest of honor is actually two people. You may have thought you were getting one pro guest named "Phil Klass (William Term)"—but you were wrong. They are actually two separate people. The common myth is that William Tenn is the pseudonym that Phil Klass uses for his science fiction stories, but this is demonstrably untrue. First of all, Phil himself tells the story (to anyone who will listen) of the time he was at a convention and observed a very debonair, stylish, auctorial personage in a smoking jacket discoursing wittily to the crowd. When he asked someone in the back of the room who was speaking, the person replied, "William Tenn." Now, Phil will claim that the speaker was actually an impostor, but that's just a bluff. Anyone who knows Phil knows that he can't be William Tenn, because to be William Tenn he would somehow, somewhere have to have found the time to write all those brilliant stories, and writing time just doesn't fit into Phil's lifestyle. So, if you find a debonair auctorial personage discoursing at this convention, and he isn't Robert Silverberg, he'll probably be your extra guest of honor, William Tenn. All this forces me to write two separate appreciations. William Tenn is a man whose stories I grew up reading, and whose stories I can re-read today with just as much pleasure (and timeliness) as they gave me in my teens. William Tenn is the man of whom Theodore Sturgeon said, "It would be too wide a generalization to say that every sf satire, every sf comedy and every attempt at witty and biting criticism found in the field is a poor and usually cheap imitation of what this man has been doing since the '40s." Well, maybe not every one, but most of them. Tenn writes everything from sidesplitting broad comedy to what he has called gentle satire—but one of his "gentle" satires is "Null-P," a tale of what happens when the President of the United States is chosen for being the most average man in the land. (Feel like you've been there recently?) His broader comedy includes a favorite of mine called The Tenants," in which Mr. Tohu and Mr. Bohu rent the nonexistent thirteenth floor of the McGowan Building, to the vast confusion of the manager. Tenn isn't always funny, either. "The Generation of Noah," for example, is one of the strongest direct statements against global war written anywhere inside or outside of the genre. Unfortunately, Term's popularity is in somewhat of a decline, largely because of the current unreasoning bias against short stories. If you read short stories, you already know his work; if you don't read short stories, make an exception—you'll find out why you're wrong. But what does all this have to do with Phil Klass? Phil has many wonderful qualities, but no one would call him debonair, stylish or auctorial. He's a great choice for a convention guest of honor for many reasons, not the least of which is that he won't be hard to find. Go to the best party, the most controversial panel, the most visible spot in the lobby—look for the most vehement conversation, the most involved participants, and listen for the loudest, most committed voices. Phil will be in that group, but to introduce yourself you may have to wait a while—he's 8 WESTERCHRON