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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 33
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 33. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/559.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 33. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/559

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 33, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/559.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 33
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_035.jpg
Transcript SATURDAY, 4 - 5:30 P.M. east Tennessee in 1878. The story does not appear to be easily subsumable under a taletype. Its interest lies in the multi-level function it seems to have served as a communicative vehicle for moral and social teachings. Connor reflects that though the humor in the tale was what attracted him to hear it "eight or ten times as I grew up," this humor was in fact secondary and served a pedagogical function in relation to the moral and social points being transmitted. Marie Sovereign, Pompano Beach, Florida. "Saci, Legend for Children." The saci is a mischevous black, one-legged character familiar to Brazilian legend. Originating in traditions among black people, he has been well delineated in a children's novel The Saci, written in 1921 by Monteiro Lobato (1884-1948). The novel describes in detail the characteristics and behavior of a saci, how he is captured by a young boy and how he leads the boy into a supernatural adventure and heroic rescue involving other supernatural beings. Elements of religion and philosophy emerge from the tale, revealing the syncretism of Black, Indian, and Western concepts in creating the saci's world. The saci has become a part of the Brazilian ethos. FANTASY IN SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYS Roan 106 Chair: Norman Nathan, Florida Atlantic University. James Whitlark, Texas Tech University. "The Fantastic in Hamlet: Equilibrium between the Real and the Imaginary." Applying to Hamlet a theory of the fantastic derived from studies of the brain shows that the play appeals equally to both sides of the mind, an uneasy equilibrium. On the one hand, such aridly logical characters as Horatio and Polonius and some use of legal, philosophical, and theological language reflect characteristics of the left brain. On the other hand, the ghost, Ophelia's madness, and the play's vivid imagery represent processes of the right brain. With truly divided mind, Hamlet hesitates between his desires for reality, permanence, and rationality and his talent for imaginative improvisation. Murray J. Levith, Skidmore College. "Illyria, Italia, Englandia: Shakespeare's Italian Settings." Many of Shakespeare's plays were written against a background of intense English interest in Italy. This interest manifested itself in travel to Italy, learning the Italian language, translating and being influenced by Italian books, and apeing Italian fashion and culture. For Renaissance Englishmen Italy was an exotic place, a fabled land. On the one hand, it was the home of Machiavelli and the Pope; on the other, it was considered the most advanced civilization of the time. The cradle of the past and now the newest frontier, Italy served in part as a metaphor for Shakespeare. Samuel J. Bernstein, Northeastern University. "Shakespeare's Othello as Bildungsroman: Reality and Fantasy in Gonflict." 1 Shakespeare's Othello may be understod symbolically as a young man undergoing a process of maturation. Like young men in novels of maturation, Othello lives partially in fantasy. Unlike them, however, his fantasizing is neither a buffer against harsh reality nor a means of integrating real and fantastic psychological elements gracefully. This is due to the powerful influence of the fantastic in his psyche and to the overwhelmingly negative influence of Iago, his enemy, also associated with fantasy. Iago functions like a wisdom figure in a novel of maturation, but is false and manages to undermine Othello's maturation. THE PREMISE AND THE STORY IN GERMAN LITERATURE: EXTENSIONS OF FANTASTIC OR UNUSUAL ASSUMPTIONS Room 108 Chair: Ernest L. Weiser, Florida Atlantic University. Hans Ternes, Lawrence University. "Michael Ende's Uhendliche Geschichte: The Promise of Phantasia." According to Michael Ende, modern man suffers from schizophrenia, his intellect is ruled by science, his moral behavior by traditional, outmoded values. The world created by the modern religion of science has become uninhabitable. Ende is convinced that the world has to be "re-humanized" by making it accessible to human experience again, by infusing it with poesy that springs from the wells of man's creative imagination. Ende's novel Un- endliche Geschichte is both an attack on the idolization of science and its dehumanizing influence as well as a search for regeneration within the eternally youthful realm of imagination. David B. Dickens, Washington and Lee University. "Kurt Kusenberg and the Quest for Higher Order." Although his work displays a concern about higher ordering forces, Kusenberg rejects most traditional explanations of human existence. Yet man by nature seeks something supra-human to lend significance to his own life. Kusenberg's characters frequently undertake the sometimes exotic, sometimes dangerous, quest for that higher order, encountering capricious chance, mysterious protectors, principles of time and physics, even the truth of the bottle. Closer examination reveals, amid humor, fantasy, and the absurd, echoes of Feuerbach and existential thought: life is what we choose to make it, and the quest's end may lie in "authentic existence" itself, no matter what its form. VISION AND VISUAL ART Room 112 Chair: Joel N. Feimer, Mercy College. James D. Luciana, Mercy College. "Photography: Object as Catalyst: An Extended Reality." An exploration of the concept of the cognitive moment as the initial inspiration that ignites in 33