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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 32
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 32. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/558.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 32. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/558

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 32, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/558.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 32
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_034.jpg
Transcript SATURDAY, 2 - 3:30 P.M. In Sam Shepard's phantasmagorical America, men and women stumble through a painful existence desperately trying to explain their origins and identities both to themselves and to the world. Their autobiographies take the form of intense monologues or passionate songs in which they attempt to describe who they are, why they are, and where they are. The monologues and songs reveal these characters self-perceptions — only when they hear what they are saying — do these people understand who they are. Michael H. Palmer, Louisburg College. "Discovering the Self of Everyman: Fantasy in Wilder's Our Town." The content of Our Town is an accumulation of many simple details of daily life. In the crucial third act, the graveyard scene, the fantasy of Emily's return from death to relive her twelth birthday and to converse with the dead is the central dramatic genius in Wilder's tale of common life. In this act, he carefully juxtaposes the simple details of living with the philosophical and metaphysical probings that fuse into a carefully articulated theme. The playwright gives to Emily's insights the yearnings of Everyman: "Life is too beautiful for anyone to realize"; only the dead truly appreciate the beauty and miracle of life. REFLECTIONS: MIRRORS IN FILM OF THE FANTASTIC Room 118 Chair: Virginia Harger-Grinling, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. Peter Harris, University of Toronto. "Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: Mirrors in Early German Film." The mirror is one of the most ubiquitous images in literature and painting through the ages. The newest art form, film, was not slow in realizing the suitability of the mirror as a visual image, for it as a primarily visual medium. Two early German films in particular, The Student of Prague (1913) and Warning Shadows (1922), demonstrate how their respective directors innovatively adapted the mirror into a cinematic image with both literal and metaphorical aspects. This paper examines how these directors achieved their adaptions. Leonard S. Heldreth, Northern Michigan University. "The Mirror as Symbol and Sign in Film." This paper will survey the traditional uses of the mirror as a symbol in literature and psychology and indicate how these interpretations carry over to film. Examples will be drawn from films as diverse as the 1910 Frankenstein and The Student of Prague through Fassbinder's recent "double" film. SATURDAY, MARCH 26 4-5:30 P. M. THE LOCUS OF FANTASY ROOM 100 Chair: Jules Zanger, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville. 32 Roger C. Schlobin, Purdue University, North Central Campus. "The Fantasy Quest and the Locus Amoenus. Among the many meaning-filled image clusters in literature, the garden is one of the most recurrent and popular. Yet, its importance in the fantasy quest has rarely, if ever, been explored. This paper discusses the stultifying and deadly locus amoenus as it attempts to seduce a wide variety of heroic protagonists in such works as Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, Nancy Kress' The Prince of Morning Bells, Roger Zelazny's Dilvish the Damned, and many others. Nancy E. James, Westminster College. "Opening a Door in the Air: The 'Beginning Place' of a Parallel World Story." One type of fantasy fiction is the parallel world story in which the protagonist passes from this world into a universe of alien species and different "natural" laws. The writer of this paper, aspiring to write a juvenile novel, analyzed four examples (two written for children and two for adults) and discovered a pattern in the story openings: the protagonist is introduced in a realistic setting, but soon there are foreshadow- ings of the fantastic, followed shortly by the character's entry into the parallel world. Differences between the juvenile and adult examples lie in the opening point of view and the extent of characterization. The writer's own first chapter, following the pattern, attempts to resemble the adult models more than the juvenile in those features and at the same time to avoid implying serious conflicts that would be more appropriate in a realistic novel. Jeannette Hume Lutton, Morehouse College. "The Garden of Eden Motif in James Baldwin." No abstract available. CLEVER CHARACTERS IN MYTH AND FOLKLORE Room 102 Chair: Judith Ortiz Gofer, University of Miami. Jack Zipes, University of Wisconsin. "Feminist Fairy Tales and Cultural Criticism in America." During the past ten years there has been a wave of feminist fairy tales written for children and adults. Along with the creative wave there have been numerous critical studies which analyze the function of fairy tales within the socialization process. Most of the studies take issue with the regressive portrayal of sex roles in the classical fairy tales, whereas the new tales expldre alternative models to improve social relations between the sexes. My paper explores the underlying socio- psychological significance of the fairy tales and the critical studies in light of cultural developments in America. Ernie Williams, Saint Leo College, Florida. "Old Ann Gibbs: A North Alabama Family Story." The story of Old Ann Gibbs was told to old-time banjoist Jim Connor, of Gadsden, Alabama, by his grandmother, Drucilla Vest Setzer, who was born in