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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 31
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 31. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/557.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 31. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/557

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 31, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/557.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 31
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_033.jpg
Transcript SATURDAY, 2 - j>:>0 P.M. individual standing midway between two basic human impulses, masculine and feminine — involving an ultimate recognition of this emotional and sexual duality in Gawain himself. jack Zipes, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee. "Feminist Fairy Tales and Cultural Criticism in Anerica." Abstract not available. . • PHILOSOPHY, SCIENCE AND SCIENCE FICTION Room 106 Chair: Thomas F. Baxley, Florida Atlantic University. Justin Leiber, University of Houston. "The Future Present Tense." In "The Future Present Tense" I explore the characteristics which differentiate science fiction from philosophy, science, and fiction. I reject the ideas that science fiction does not play a potent role in the development of civilization, while science and philosophy dp, and that it is intended merely as entertainment. Neither does it simply present prophecies about the future, but it is our literature of ideas expressed in the future present tense. I maintain that science fiction attends to and changes general features of life rather than simply inventing a few incidents and characters and that our own world is put in relief through this contrast. Richard W. Wolters, Doane College. "Science Fiction: Literature and Philosophy." I begin by defining science fiction and establishing that science fiction is more than a literary form. It is a culture-wide phenomenon, each manifesta- tion of which displays in its own way what I call the mythic signification of science fiction. I then indicate the immense influence this myth has had on contemporary philosophy, analyzing its presence in Strawson's Individuals as an example. Acceptance of the myth has some disadvantages, however. I discuss one of these, using a recent article by Richard Rorty as focal point, and argue that philosophers should back away from the myth. Frederick Bruce Olsen, Montgomery, Alabama. "Notes Toward the Epistemology of Science Fiction." I explore in functional terms the epistemology of science fiction; or that is to say, the consideration of what is predicated to what, and in so doing, define in a particular way the originality of the genre. I also demonstrate the difference between science fiction and other kinds of fiction by showing how it occupies a new place in the complex bundle of fictional narrators and their authority. My argument is historical as well as analytical. Though relatable to other kinds of fiction that have gone before it, science fiction nevertheless occupies a previously unfilled niche in the realm of fictional possibility. 1 i THE COSMIC WINDOW: DREAM AND VISION AS REALITY Room 112 Chair: Joel N. Feimer, Mercy College. Brigitte Pampel, Loyola University of Chicago. "Stindberg's Dream Play: Dream and Reality." Although the theme of suffering is found throughout Strindberg's work, his "inferno" brought with it some obvious changes in dramatic form. Instead of staging man's doomed existence in graphic and naturalistic scenes, Strindberg in his later work turned to visions to express the reality of the human condition. The Dream Play (1902) serves as an excellent example of this new method. The structure of the play is similar to that of a dream. The scenes are seemingly disconnected yet meaningful to the play as as whole. The central character is the daughter of the Buddhist god ^Indra, and she is to determine whether man's constant complaints are justified. It is in this form of fantasy, dream, and vision that Stridberg examines man's reality. Frank Bryce McCluskey, Mercy College. "Borges: Dream as Reality." The Orient has prized dreams as a source of knowledge and inspiration. While there is this tendency in Western thought, they have not had a central role in the mainstream of the analytical- rational tradition. The Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges stands outside this tradition and values the dream on a par with waking experience. Borges uses the revelatory character of the dream to point out some of the problems with the western analytical rational tradition, and his use of the dream points out other typologies that are possible. This paper will show that Borges' treatment of the dream state challenges the whole ontology and epistemology of mainstream western thought and offers us a fresh perspective upon the world. Joel N. Feimer, Mercy College. "The Rehabilitation of Dream Vision in Doris Lessing's The Four Gated City." The dream vision as an effective link between men and cosmic reality, divinity, and eternity had a long and august history in myth and literature from classical antiquity to the early Renaissance. The Age of Reason denied dream vision its veracity and relegated it to the category of phantasm. With the advent of modern psychology, interest in the dream vision was revived. Martha Quest, the heroine of Lessing's The Four Gated City, wages a successful campaign to reestablish the ancient value and function of the dream vision for her generation and ours. HOW DO I KNOW WHO I AM UNTIL I SAY WHO I AM: LANGUAGE AS SELF-DISCOVERY IN MODERN DRAMA Room 116 Chair: Francis Gillen, University of Tampa. Edelma de Leon, Appalachian State University. "The Man I Made Up Is Me: Self-Discovery in Sam Shepard's Plays." 31