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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 30
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 30. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/556.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 30. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/556

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 30, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/556.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 30
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_032.jpg
Transcript SATURDAY, 11 A.M. - 12:30 P.M. Rnight." Gawain's journey through Logres in search of the Green Chapel is marked by dangers which supplement the mortal test he must face upon reaching his destination; at every river crossing he is threatened by monsters — specifically wolves, bulls, bears, boars, dragons, giants, and wild men. It is easy to see how "wild men" could be identified with the sin of Envy. Gawain is perfectly capable of dealing with any and all sins, provided they manifest themselves as obvious, external threats: it is sin in the disguised and attractive form of chivalric manners and fin amor that gives him trouble. Joel N. Feimer, Mercy College. "English Myth and French Fantasy: The Giant of Mont St. Michel in the Alliterative Morte Arthure." This paper demonstrates the infusion of the techniques of fantasy, which may be found in the twelfth century romances of Chretien de Troyes into the horrifying but stark mythological arthur- ian figure, the Giant of Mont St. Michel. His portrait as established by Geoff rey of Monmouth and developed by Wace and Layamon is substantially embellished in the fourteenth century alliterative Morte Arthure with the aid of some fantastic elements for which analogues may be found in Chretien's Giant Herdsman from Yvain." narratives "Der Sandmann" and "Automata." A review of the history of these mechanical people and the interpretation of two works by Hoffmann in which they appear introduces a discussion of their use as a vehicle for the presentation and analysis of the reflexivity in the experience of art. The mysteries of the automata and the other strange and incomplete experiences in Hoffmann's narratives become the means of setting up resonances that continue reverberating pendulum-like within the imagination of characters within the narratives and readers of them. Thomas A. Kamla, University of Scranton. "Oral Sadism in E.T.A. Hoffmann's 'Vampirgeschichte'." A latent oral-sadistic content informs E.T.A. Hoffmann's novella "Vampirgeschichte," which makes the vividly portrayed closing scene — the heroine Aurellile feeding on the flesh of an exhumed corpse — psychologically explainable in that it points to a fantasy on her part to reestablish a narcissistic equilibrium that had been threatened in early childhood. Hoffmann treats precisely those prototypical junctures of life (infancy and nourishment, the parent as narcissistic complement, maternal dependence and incorporation, puberty, etc.) which, if frustrated in their normal development, lead to a loss of self-esteem and ultimately to the kind of aggressive oral incorporation suggested by the title. SATURDAY, MARCH 26 2-3:30 P. M. THE FANTASTIC IN THE WORKS OF E.T.A. HOFFMANN Room 100 Chair: Hans Ternes, Lawrence University. Andras Sandor, Howard University. "Myth and Satire: Hoffmann's 'Der Goldene Topf ii The paper distinguishes between sublime and ironical myths. Greek creation-myths may characterize the former, Winnebago trickster-myths the later. From a sociological point of view, sublime myths are in harmony with unquestioned authority; ironical myths are characteristic of a mentality which does not know of an unquestioned authority. The long tales (Marchen) of E.T.A. Hoffman are ironical myths. The mythical element is as widespread in them as the satirical. I shall analyze The Golden Pot as an exemplary work of this category and pay particular attention to Lindhorst, the Salamander, whose nature and function can be equated with that of the trickster-figure of ironical myths. Ernest L. Weiser, Florida Atlantic University. "Hoffmann's Automata: The Mysterious Resonance of Art." Previous studies of the automata miss the essential meaning of their portrayal in Hoffmann's FEMALES AND THE FEMININE IN FANTASY Room 102 Chair: S. C. V. Sterner, C. W. Post College. Marleen Barr, Virginia Polytechnic Institute. "Dame Unise, Feminist Maiden Who Fares Well with the Patriarchy." After voyaging out from enclosed worlds, four female protagonists of recent feminist fantasy derive self-awareness from experiencing solitary adventure. Once their adventure ends, they are ensconced within a new protected environment, safely — and sometimes literally — embraced by strong female support. The pattern is traced in Anne McCaffrey's Dragonsong A(1976); Suzy McKee Charnas' Motherlines (1978); and Elizabeth A. Lynn's The Northern Girl (1980). Jessica Amanda Salmonson's "The Prodigal Daughter" (1981) continues this emerging tradition. To exemplify the directions of contemporary feminist fantasy, this essay will discuss Salmonson's story in terms of the three previously mentioned texts. References to Louis Bernikow's Among Women will link these works to contemporary feminist reality. Arthur Coleman, C. W. Gawain's Armour." Post College. "Chinks in Sir Sir Gawain and the Green Knight has often been read as a "test" tale, with Gawain's chastity the value tested. But the choice of the word "chastity" to define the nature of Gawain's trial is highly suggestive in that it is the one term most often used in reference to female continence and virginity. In this sense, therefore, SGGK can be read as a clasic psychological metaphor of the • 30