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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 29
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 29. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/555.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 29. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/555

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 29, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/555.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 29
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_031.jpg
Transcript Saturday, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. reality of living — lends itself to fantasy; and ED created the language necessary to treat the subject successfully in this mode. Among poems elucidated to explore this fantastical dimension are "The not live yet," "Behind me dips eternity," "No crowd that has occurred," "The Bible is an Antique volume," "Two lengths has every day," "This world is not conclusion," "Great streets of silence led away," "I felt a funeral in my brain," "The only News I know/Is Bulletins all Day/From Immortality." FANTASTIC ANIMALS IN NAIVE EXPRESSIONS: LECTURES Room 112 THREE SLIDE Chair: Joan Digby, C. W. Post College, L.I.U. Marjorie Gottheimer and Joyce Rosa, C. W. Post College, L.I.U. "The Tarasque: History and Iconography of a Fantastic Animal." The Tarasque was said to have infested the banks of the Rhone River where it lay in wait to trap wandering children. Depicted in different ways by various anonymous artists and craftsmen, the monster is seen sometimes as a hybrid dragon and sometimes as a lion, most times as a combination of both. The most frightening aspect of the beast is the fact that the face appears to be very human because of the eyes and nose. The paper traces the monster from pre-history to the recent past where, in the city of Tarascon, a yearly fete celebrating the taming of the beast by St. Mar the was still held. The dispursion of the myth through Southern France and Spain shows how a cultural idea has been transmitted by legend and visual image. Allene S. Phy, Alabama State University. "Miss Bianca: Mouse Heroine of Fantasy Fiction." Miss Bianca is clearly an animal fantasy, within the fable, fairy tale convention. Between 1959 and 1972 she appeared as an engaging character in a continued series of books intended for children but with some adult appeal. In vivid words and illustrations Margery Sharp and Garth Williams have devised a compassionate and witty contemporary animal fantasy. Miss Bianca is a highly individual "personality," yet is at the same time a proud member of her species. Theresa Eppridge, College of New Rochelle. "Fantastic Images in the Prints of Leah Qumaluk." Dream, legend, and tradition are the sources of inspiration for Leah Qumaluk, a well-known Eskimo printmaker from the Canadian Arctic. By distortion and fusion of forms she achieves imagery that is both powerful and grotesque. Some of the boldness of the prints comes from the techniques used to produce them. This paper accompanied by slides considers sources of Qumaluk's images, the cultural significance of her iconography, and the techniques used to create the characteristic qualities of these graphic prints. LOVE AND WAR Room 116 Chair: Philip Kuhn, University of Florida. Ralph Yarrow, University of East Anglia. "War as Myth and Archetype: Confrontation and Transformation in Celine and Simon." War as chaotic experience becomes the ultimate challenge to the constructive imagination. Celine and Simon use its symbolic energy to destroy vieux mythes of behaviour, language and identity; their use of metaphor and syntax presents war as an elemental situation of confrontation. But irony and narrative distance prevent masochistic self- indulgence, and instead assure the possibility of learning to reorganize structure on the other side of night and dissolution. War thus reveals and triggers fundamental qualities of human consciousness, relocating language and identity as a continuous project. Brian Murphy, Oakland University. "The Beatles: Their Sound Has Gone Out." The songs of The Beatles, from 1963 to 1970, are remarkable not only for their influence on popular music and cultural history, but their dramatic coherence — as if many of the songs constituted a kind of gigantic song cycle built around a standard three-act conflict: boys find love; boys lose love; boys, through remarkable acts of imagination and a faith in fantasy, find a renewed and creative love. Mindy Percival, Florida Atlantic University. "Life (?) After Nuclear War." Many themes in fiction, science fiction, and fantasy help distance readers from the horror of a nuclear event, and thus actually aid in creating acceptance of this possibility. Notions of life after death, space colonization, and the purging and rebuilding of civilization are some of the themes that work toward this end. Science fiction and fantasy are thus "champions of a false security" regarding the nuclear issue. MONSTERS IN ARTHURIAN LEGEND Room 118 Chair: Thomas E. Vesce, Mercy College. R. H. Thompson, Acadia University. "The Dragon in Medieval Arthurian Romance: Chretien de Troyes' Yvain." The Dragon appears with surprising rarity in medieval Arthurian romance. As an examination of the function of the fire-breathing serpent within the structure of Chretien de Troyes' Yvain shows, reasons can be found in the rationalizing tendency of the romance genre on the one hand, and the specifically diabolical associations of the dragon on the other. Richard R. Griffith, Long Island University. "A Ebe at Every Ford: Monsters in Sir Gawain and the Green 29