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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 28
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 28. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/554.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 28. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/554

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 28, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/554.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_030.jpg
Transcript Saturday, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. i FANTASY UTOPIAS Room 102 Chair: Roger C. Schlobin, Purdue University, North Central Campus. Walter Gershuny, Northeastern University. "Rococo Utopias: Evocations of Gnide in Eighteenth Century France." The literary depictions of Gnide in eighteenth- century France offered a vision of Utopia as conceived in rococo terms. As evoked by Montesquieu, Leonard, and Colardeau, this seductive world, consecrated to the cult of Venus and the pleasures of love, served as a wishfulfillment fantasy of a society drawn to the dual ideals of escapism and sensual delectation. So too, these evocations reflected the rococo's dual attitude towards love, in which the idealized flourished alongside the erotic. Brian Attebery, Idaho State University. "Fantasy as an Anti-Utopian Genre." Many fantasies portray societies seemingly engineered to promote human happiness. However, in most of these stories, the apparent Utopias turn out to be oppressive or to deaden inquiry and initiative in their citizens. When a truly "good place" appears in fantasy, it is generally administered by beings wiser than mere man (Oz is run by a sorceress and a fairy, Malacandra by an angel) or it is portrayed as a limited, fragile thing. Sometimes it is simply left offstage so that we need not be troubled by possible flaws. Fantasy may be inherently inhospitable to Utopia, being concerned primarily with the psychic integration or spiritual growth of an individual rather than with the reformation of society. HUMOR IN FANTASY Room 106 Chair: Walter Herrscher, University of Wisconsin, Green Bay. Richard Allan Schwartz, Florida International University. "Underlying Incongruity: An Analysis of Tragic, Comic, and Fantastic Disparities." Existing studies identify incongruity as a basis for humor. John Allen Paulos refines that point further, indicating that "A perceived incongruity with a point and an appropriate emotional climate...seems to be necessary and sufficient for humor." Using Paulos' definition as a starting point, I argue that the emotional climate determines the incongruity's fundamental nature (i.e., tragic, comic, fantastic, or some other) as well as its meaning. The emotional climate results largely from the dynamic relationship between our desires for and our expectations about a character's fate. The emotional climate also has implications for the reader's perception of the universe as ordered or disordered and for his or her general sense of being in control. Gordon Slethaug, University of Waterloo, Ontario. "Parody in Thurber's The White Deer: Tarnish on 28 the American Dream." In an essay on "Fairy-Stories" published in 1949, J.R.R. Tolkien accepts the possibility that fantasy may contain satire, but cautions that "if there is any satire present in the tale, one thing must not be made fun of, the magic itself." Since James Thurber wrote The White Deer in 1945, he cannot have read Tolkien's statement and would probably not have agreed anyway since the very essence of the book is a burlesquing of American Culture in the 40's and a parodying of the form of fantasy, including magic. As an implicit overturning of Tolkien's assumptions about the nature of fantasy, this book playfully demolishes the things Americans live by — their customs and habits, their institutions, and their romantic conceptions of life. Jean Tobin, University of Wisconsin Center, Sheboygan. "A Myth, A Memory, A Will-O-The-Wish: Peter Beagle's Funny Fantasy." Humor, seldom considered a prime characteristic of fantasy, pervades Peter Beagle's The Last Unicorn, both the book published in 1968 and the animated film released late in 1982. This paper investigates Beagle's use of humor is this work and focuses on a kind of humor — one based on incongruity of consciousness, such as that held by timeless creatures who know their own literary history up to the present — which may be unique to fantasy. Peter Jordan, Tennessee State University. "Wish Fulfillment: The Innocent Humor of Thorne Smith." This paper will explore the novels of Thorne Smith in light of the comedy generated by the central fantasy of stepping beyond the bounds and crashing against the prison of social convention. FLIGHTS OF FANTASY: EMILY DI Room 108 * «i:*.t Chair: Michael H. Palmer, Louisburg College. Nicholas Roddick, University of Regina. "'The Tint I cannot take— is best—': Extraspectral Color in Emily Dickinson's Poetry." The fantastic writer's technique of estrangement by breaking the bounds of orthodox (usually Newtonian) physics was appropriated extremely effectively by Emily Dickinson in a group of poems that show both the limitations of ordinary perception and the potentialities afforded by extraspectral (i.e. outside the Newtonian visible spectrum) vision. This she did by positing the existence of new colors whose manifestations, ubiquitous and perceptible by all, give intimations of a transcendent realm where immortality is possible. Michael H. Palmer, Louisburg College. "'Bulletins from Immortality': Fantastical Dimensions in the Poetry of Emily Dickinson." The very ethereal nature of Emily Dickinson's subject — that realm beyond the grave, beyond the • i