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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 27
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 27. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/553.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 27. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/553

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 27, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/553.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 27
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_029.jpg
Transcript 9HBHHH Saturday, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. inexplicable intrusion of the extraordinary into the everyday. His "extraterrestrials" are really updated versions of the trolls, dwarves, and elves of fairy tales. E.T. is the best of his "suburban fantasies" because it is closest to the fairy tale pattern, following the psychological development of a child. The character E.T. can be seen as Jung's "eternal child" or child god and also as the boy Elliott's magical alter ego, his repressed animal side or budding sexuality, helping him to grow up. Robert Sprich, Bentley College, Massachusetts. "'When Worlds Collide': The Spectrum of Viewer Responses to Star Wars and The empire Strikes Back." Star Wars (1977) has become the top box office success in film history, and its sequel, The Empire Strikes Back (1980), is also among the top ten money-makers of all time. But a careful comparison of the two films leads to a paradox: although the main characters and situation are ostensibly the same and the plot-line is continued, the unconscious dynamics of audience responses are strikingly different. Star Wars is seen as up-beat and life-affirming while its sequel presents a pessimistic view of life. Association and Pricksongs and Descants, Aldo us Huxley's After Many a Summer Dies the Swan, and Thomas Mann's Death in Venice. Donald Palumbo, Northern Michigan University. "Sexuality and the Allure of Fantasy Literature." While fantasy alleviates our fear of death obliquely by ever suggesting that the unknown in general is merely the familiar transformed — and directly through depictions of life after death, forms of immortality, and resurrections — it also more subtly releases us from the thrall of death through its treatment of sexuality. For it is in fantasy most specifically that sex — the precursor and symbol of life, of renewal, of the survival of the species despite the deaths of individuals — is death's antidote. SATURDAY, MARCH 26 1 1 A. M. - 1 2 : 3 0 P. M. SEXUALITY AND THE FANTASTIC IN LITERATURE AND FILM Room 118 Chair: Donald Palumbo, Northern Michigan University. Anthony Ambrogio, Wayne State University. "The Sexual Subtext of Ridley Scott's Alien: or, In Space, No One Can Hear Your Primal Scream." In Alien (1979), the Nostromo's crew members do not have sex because they are really children: siblings not interested in sexual relations but more concerned about their relationship with their Mother (the ship's computer), a relationship complicated by the arrival of the Alien, a child- molesting penis whose sole activity is indiscriminate rape, violation. Instead of protecting them, their unfeeling, love-denying Mother colludes with the beast. Caught between a rock and a hard place, the children die from rape or its resultant unnatural "childbirth," until one breaks free from her no-longer-safe nest/womb, destroys both the Alien and Mother, and midwives her own "birth"/rebirth. Ann R. Morris, Stetson University. "The Dialectic of Sex and Death in Fantasy." Contrary to Jung's concept of eros and thanatos as "the great instinctual adversaries," literary fantasy shows the complex dialectic between the two. Man not only flees death in sexual fantasy and fantasizes about death in the midst of copulation; he also welcomes death as a demon lover and sees it, like sex, as a powerful creative stimulus. This ongoing, perhaps unresolvable dialectic between sex and death is discussed in a number of works, particularly John Irving's The World According to Garp, Robert Coover's Universal Baseball NARRATIVE STRATEGIES IN FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION Room 100 Chair: Olena Saciuk, Universidad Interamericana. Carlos Hortas, Hunter College, CUNY. "Humor in the Works of Jack Vance." A comparison of Jack Vance's more "serious" fiction with some of his lighter works. The paper will demonstrate that by the use of certain techniques such as inversion, incongruity, irony, and a feeling for the absurd in human activity, Jack Vance creates an effective and humorous parody of certain science fiction conventions. The use of parody is evidence of the health and vitality of a genre that is able to poke fun at itself. Ttam Dunn, Miami University, Hamilton. "A Comparison of Narrative Structure in LeGuin's The Dispossessed and Pohl's Gateway." Ursula K. LeGuin's The Dispossessed and Frederik Pohl's Gateway make use of a plot-structuring device which we may call metaphorically the "riffled" narrative; that is to say, in each case the story is split halfway in its chronology and the two halves are then "shuffled" so that the reader in effect takes in both half-stories at the same time. While both LeGuin and Pohl realize gains in story impact from it, the gains are not the same. Perhaps the long-standing criticism that science fiction does not have the sophistication of main stream writing misses the mark: it has its own kind of sophistication and is evolving and developing critical forms and structures appropriate to its particular undertaking. 27