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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 26
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 26. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 26. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/552

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 26, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 26
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_028.jpg
Transcript Saturday, 9 - 10:30 a.m. on the artifice of his fictions (and of science fiction) by casting them in the forms of parables, fables, and enigmas, and by weaving through them a texture of cross-references, of reflexive dreaming, and of self-conscious humor. Interpretation depends on the reader's double consciousness both of reality and artifice in the fictive world of a single story and also of the real and artificial correspondences among stories in the sequence. The sense which can be made of Last Orders, then, depends on the reader's use of Aldiss' first principles of interpretation to trace a constellation of meaning. Willis E. McMelly, California State University Fullerton. "Entropy, Stasis, and Change in Aldiss." Brian Aldiss' works seem obsessed with the problem of entropy, stasis, and change. They are related to Aldiss' view of art in Report on Probability A and The Malacia Tapestry. These works form the major structures upon which Aldiss' ideas of movement or progression are based. Some attention will be given to the same problem in Helliconia Spring and Life in the West. ARCHITECTURE AND THE FANTASTIC IN LITERATURE Room 112 Chair: Grant Critchfield, University of Vermont. Barbara T. Cooper, University of New Hampshire. "L'Envers du decor: The Space of Enchantment in George Sand's Cbnsuelo." Chapter 95 of George Sand's Consuelo includes a description of the Royal Opera House of Vienna as seen from backstage. Following an analysis of this description, I shall show how this backstage space — located half way between reality and pure illusion — functions not only as the site of a fantastic experience, but also as a verbal and visual metaphor for the place of the fantastic in the human imagination. Frank J. Miller, Colby College. "Petersburg Madness in Russian Literature." During the 19th Century, St. Petersburg came to be regarded as artificial and European in contrast with Moscow, the true Russian city. Russian literature of this period often characterizes the residents of Petersburg by their insincerity and mental instability in comparison with the genuineness of Moscovites. In "The Queen of Spades" and "The Bronze Horseman," Pushkin introduced into Russian letters the theme of Petersburg madness which was further developed by Gogol, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy. The artificiality of the city complements the artifice of its inhabitants. Virginia A. Harger-Grinling, Memorial University of Newfoundland. "Djinn by Alain Robbe-Grillet: or the Architecture of the Fantastic." Djinn's superficial simplicity, its veneer of grammatical and architectural precision are in fact totally deceptive, and what is assumed as outer real space is gradually revealed to be the 26 inner tormented space operating on laws alien to accepted logic and comprehension. The novel's detailed preciseness and resultant confusion is that of the protagonist but also reflects the deliberate intention of the author to implicate the reader in his creation. It the purpose of this paper to examine the means by which Alain Robbe- Grillet permits entry to his particular world of the fantastic and to show how, by the structure of the novel, distance is created between reader and text, in order that a comprehension of of this particular novel in the context of the total work of the author may be obtained. Mark Bernheim, Miami University. "The Never-Never Land of Architecture and Real Estate Advertising in Dos Passos' The Big Money." The use of fantastic descriptive language for the development of South Florida in the 1920s reveals the unreal mental and spiritual atmosphere and the corruption of the American Dream which Dos Passos attacks in his trilogy. Public relations hype bordering on the surreal links the authentic constructs of a never-never land with a refusal of contemporary reality. FILM FANTASY Room 116 Chair: Mike Budd, Florida Atlantic University. James Van Dyck Card, Old Dominion University. "Some Fantasy of the Forties." Although fantasy during the forties was sometimes said to lead to box office disaster, several films such as Here Gomes Mr. Jordan were highly popular, and several others such as Rene Clair's It Happened Tomorrow and Jul ien Duvivier's Flesh and Fantasy have been unjustly neglected. During the period England produced two superior fantasies, Stairway to Heaven and Dead of Night, which were partly indebted to Hollywood productions. Mike Budd, Florida Atlantic University. "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari: The Fantastic and The Uncanny." Although the 1920 German Expressionist film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari does not fit neatly into either the fantastic genre as defined by Todorov or the uncanny as defined by Freud, its resemblance to these genres helps to reveal its curiously unstable and heterogeneous structure, an uneasy mix of realist and modernist elements. The reader's "hesitation" described by Todorov is most likely a retrospective one in viewers of Caligari, while the peculiar ambivalences of the film are partly a result of the repression of classical narrative, as in Freud's concept of the uncanny as the return of the repressed. Andrew Gordon, University of Florida. "E.T. as Fairy Tale." Steven Spielberg is our wizard of the suburbs, transforming tract homes into fairytale cottages. In Close Encounters, Poltergeist, and E.T., he deals not in science fiction but fantasy, the