Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 25
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 25. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/551.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 25. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/551

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 25, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/551.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 25
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_027.jpg
Transcript Saturday, 9 - 10:30 a.m. Katherine Fishburn, Michigan State University. "Recognition and Re-cognition in Doris Lessing's Science Fiction." In all her science fiction, Doris Lessing challenges our views of reality through the complementary formal techniques of recognition and re-cognition. That is, she is forcing us to see ourselves and to change ourselves. Through recognition Lessing gives us greater insight on ourselves by allowing us to recognize ourselves in the alien world of the text. But at the same time we begin to change, not just our view of the world, but our very definition of reality itself. By making us self-conscious readers, Lessing opens our minds and transforms our perceptual paradigms and thus the world itself. MASKS AND THE FANTASTIC IN DRAMA Room 102 Chair: Francis Gillen, University of Tampa. Susan Harris Smith, University of Pittsburgh, Mask in Modern Drama: An Overview." "The From 1896, the date of Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi, to the present, about 225 plays using masks have been written for the Western stage. The various uses to which masks have been put reflect not only our historical and cultural heritage, but also specifically modern ideas about aesthetics, psychology, and sociology. The mask has figured prominently in every significant and influential experimental artistic movement, challenging the primacy of language and becoming both a profound metaphor in the text and a powerful emblem on the stage. The use of masks can be divided roughly into four broad categories: satiric and grotesque; ritual, myth, and spectacle; dream images and psychological projections; and social roles assumed or imposed. F. Robert Lehmeyer, The University of Alabama in Birmingham. "Mask and Marionette: Schnitzler's World Theater." Throughout his artistic life as dramatist Arthur Schnitzler was fascinated by the human need to hide behind masks and to play a role in society. This role playing is an integral part of his great play Reigen, and in his Paracelsus the statement is baldly made: "We are all playing roles. He who knows that is wise." In his trio of one-act plays Marionetten Schnitzler examines once again the question of human identity. Is life, after all, a game and we merely players? Are we in fact free agents or merely puppets made to move at the whim of an unknown force? Una Chaudhuri, New York University. "Black Faces, White Masks: The Semiotics of the Racialized Self ^in Genet's The Blacks." Jean Genet's play The Blacks is at one and the same time an analysis of theatrical signs such as mask and a drama employing these signs. Genet uses mask to comment on the reduction of a person's complex selfhood to role, by both the audience and the actors. The ritual in the play can be seen as an attempt to recapture a pre- semiotized, pre-blackened/whitened self. THE INVERTED PERSPECTIVE Room 106 Chair: Judith Kollmann, University of Michigan, Flint. Patricia Traub, Floral Park, New York. "Of Vonda, and Snake, and Sand: Dreamsnake, a Recognition of the Female Hero." The central myth in human life is the journey of the hero. A constant in literature is the individual's search for identity, a seeking of the Self — the mythic dimension. If, as Joan Didion says, "We tell ourselves stories in order to live," what does the story of the female hero reveal; what does it engender in the reader? Vonda N. Mclntyre's novel, Dreamsnake, evokes one of the hero's thousand faces, the face of the healer, Snake, whose rare dreamsnake has been destroyed. Not alien, Amazon, or other — Mclntyre's hero and her journey suggests an archetype of the future manifesting in the present, the female hero. Julia G. Cruz, Washington State University. "Asterion's Reflections." In "The House of Aster ion," Jorge Luis Borges, one of the patriarchs of the Neo-Fantastic in literature, presents the inverted perspective of the often-told myths revolving around Asterion. In doing so, Borges has lent a new and original facet to the ancient Greek myth. The objective of this paper is to study the content of that ancient Greek myth through Borges' inverted perspective and examine the innovative procedures through which he achieves this effect. Douglas Miller, University of Michigan, Flint. "Hoffmann's Murr the Cat: The Philistine and the Fantastic." E.T.A. Hoffmann's unfinished novel Murr the Cat (1820-22) makes us aware of the disparity between the comfortable assumptions of the Philistine and elements of fantasy that surround and sometimes endanger our lives in the real world. Reason and Fantasy are given separate voices through the ficional device of two books "accidentally" interwoven into one. The radical confrontation between these two views produces a pointedly grotesque statement on the impossibility of reaching a true understanding of the world through the application of reason. BRIAN ALDISS Room 108 Chair: Richard Mathews, University of Tampa. Philip E. Smith, University of Pittsburgh. "Last Orders and First Principles for the Interpretation of Aldiss' Enigmas." The structure and contents of Brian Aldiss' Last Orders suggest not only a theory of science fiction, but also a method of reading. Aldiss insists 25