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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 23
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 23. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/549.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 23. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/549

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 23, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/549.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 23
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_025.jpg
Transcript Friday, 4 - 5:30 p.m. of his most acute critics. Indeed, certain verbal signs seem to have been planted deliberately by Poe to indicate that the tale has an allegorical level. Closer reading, however, suggests that the Red Death, unquestionably a masterpiece of "effect," is also a serious hoax: for when the signs laid by the "allegorist" are followed, the would-be exegete discovers that the apparent allegorical interpretation evaporates before his bewildered eyes. Peter Cersowsky, Wurzburg, West Germany. "Variants of Fantastic Poetry: E. A. Poe and Georg Trakl ii The lack of convincing answers to the question whether the fantastic can occur in poetry is due to the ahistorical character of most genre definitions. One concept of fantastic poetry is, in fact, exemplified by Poe. This paper focuses on Poe's own understanding of the term "fantastic" as part of a dualistic structure with particular reference to his poem "The Haunted Palace." Poe's concept turns out to be an important influence on the poetry of Georg Trakl. Trakl adopts what is "fantastic" in Poe's eyes without maintaining the dualism. Instead, the fantastic is made the sole dimension of his poetry. Hal Blythe and Charlie Sweet, Eastern Kentucky University. "The Tale of the Fortunate Fall." In this work of "fictional criticism," a Dupinesque character provides a solution to the mystery of Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher." MOTIFS AND STRUCTURES OF HIGHER STATES OF CONSCIOUSNESS II ROOM 106 Chair: Ralph Yarrow, University of East Anglia. John H. Flodstrom, University of Louisville. "How will we know when the dreaming ends?" Stanislaw Lem's novel The Futurological Congress raises the question whether there is any adequate way to distinguish one state of consciousness from another. The novel's hero can find no criterion that is capable of guaranteeing that he is awake rather than dreaming. The description of a peculiar conscious state experienced by the novel's hero contradicts Lem's own materialist account of intelligence, showing that a different explanation is needed. It is suggested, on the basis of recent psychological and neurophysiological research, that the ability to assess reality satisfactorily demands an adequate account of the higher states of consciousness. Herbert Marder, University of Illinois. "Borderline Fantasies: The Two Worlds of Briefing for a Descent into Hell. Doris Lessing's Briefing for a Descent into Hell is a borderline fantasy — that is, a story in which the boundaries between ordinary and estranged realities are deliberately obscured. The ambiguity of the narrative throws our epistemolog- ical assumptions into relief and permits the writer to challenge received ideas about causal relationships and historical order. The mythic voyager (Watkins' fantastic alter ego) re-enacts the evolution of species and human societies in his own progress toward a higher state of consciousness. He attempts to reconcile cosmic and mundane realities, although his human limitations are too great to permit the final incorporation of what he has learned. Nevertheless, the reader is impelled to participate in the voyager's mythical thinking, and to consider the holistic fantasy as a viable complement to the linear and rational viewpoint represented by Doctors X and Y. Peter Malekin, University of Durham, England. "Tempest in the Mind." Using the model of the mind developed in "The Art of Consciousness," Shakespeare's The Tempest is shown to exploit the practical potentialities of the stage to modify the audience's awareness and orientation to the world: the mind breaks free of the limits of ordinary consciousness; then fantastic becomes the inevitable. In this respect Shakespeare is the first of the moderns, a contemporary writer: the techniques of The Tempest and of Harlan Ellison's "The Whimper of Whipped Dogs" are compared and distinguished. TIME TRAVEL TO THE PAST Room 108 Chair: Bud Foote, Georgia Tech. David Leon Higdon, Texas Tech University. "The Past Was Safe: Time Travel in Brian Aldiss' Fiction." Despite the paradoxes posed, Brian Aldiss has repeatedly transported his characters into the past. Aldiss is not only self-consciously rebelling against the conventions of travel into the future established by HjG. Wells and others, he is writing "counterbooks," a type of literary alternative world which redacts and reinterprets the earlier work — what Aldiss has himself called "exegetical novels." Time travel to the past, so evident in the works of Brian Aldiss, Michael Moorcock, and even Brian Moore, is part of a larger literary movement gradually reassessing the uses of and the need for the past. An important science-fiction convention, the anxiety of influence, and a cultural direction thus merge in time travel. Jdta Franklin Miller III, North Texas State University. "A Theoretical Basis for Travel into the Past." Can we travel into the past? Of course. We do it daily. How? By memory! But we can travel into a more distant past through methods which link us to our reincarnational past, by "extended memory" or tuning in to the Cosmic Mind, or through telepathic attunement to others' pasts. Where is the past? In the Eternal Now of the Consciousness of the Divine. Three metaphors are offered to clarify the possibility of time travel: consciousness of time as the "inside" if space; consciousness of time as Light; and past/present/future as Eternally Present in the Mind of God. Rand Bohrer, Georgia Tech, with Marc Goodman. "Travel to Other Microworlds (Elsewhere and Elsewhen) via 23