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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 21
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 21. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/547.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 21. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/547

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 21, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/547.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 21
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_023.jpg
Transcript Friday, 2 - 3:30 p.m. to strange, but pleasing and positive, flights of fancy. The shift in the third poem, from an Edenic vision to one of blasted terrain and desolation, also involves a feminine creation on the part of the speaker. MOTIFS AND STRUCTURES OF HIGHER STATES OF CONSCIOUSNESS Room 106 Chair: Ralph Yarrow, University of East Anglia. Carmine Sarracino, Elizabethtown College. "Fantasy and the Expansion of Consciousness." The expansion of consciousness is, implicitly and explicitly, one of the main themes of fantasy, and therein may reside the most worthwhile justification of the genre. Using a model of consciousness based upon Maharishi Mahesh Yogi's Vedic "Science of Creative Intelligence" (since the Vedas present a comprehensive elucidation of higher states of consciousness) I consider the purpose of fantasy to be the restoration in us of a sense of wonder, and of heroic "supernornal" capacities that characterize Vedic "enlightenment." If, as the Vedas claim, such potential is in fact realizable through, for instance, Transcendental Meditation, then fantasy holds before us more steadily and dramatically than any other genre this attainable vision of possibilities. Peter Malekin, University of Durham. "The Art of Consc iousness." Before any motifs or structures germane to higher states of consciousness can be located in art, it is first necessary to define those higher states themselves and to clarify the altered relationship with the objective world entailed by them. This is possible, since writers who deal with them (including Plato, Plotinus, Christian mystics, Taoists, Patanjali and some modern philosophers) are consistent in the model of the mind they develop. This model illuminates the way a whole range of literature, from Shakespeare to Blake and modern science fiction, can not only convey feelings and ideas (the objects of consciousness), but alter modes of consciousness as such. C. W. J. Spinks, Trinity University. "Semiotic Approaches to Higher States of Consciousness." This paper is an examination of semiotic approaches to higher states of consciousness. It first sketches a tri-partite typology of different systems for attaining altered states of consciousness bio-chemical, bio-feedback, and semiotic, and it argues that the first two are primarily semiotic in nature in that they are neurological and physiological preparations to semiotic shifts in values and perceptions. The paper then looks at the relationships between dreams, the shamanistic tradition, and the trickster figure as elements in the semeosis of altered states. Finally it uses Peir- cean models to argue that higher states of consciousness are fundamental aspects of the signification process of human beings and closely related to what Peirce called the "logic of discovery." THOMAS BURNETT SWANN Room 108 Chair: Robert A. Collins, Florida Atlantic University. Joy M. Schwab, Florida Atlantic University. "Lady of the Bees: The Eternal Feminine." In this work Swann delineates those female roles and characteristics which encourage the evolution and survival of mankind. Mellonia, the good and the beautiful, carries Swann's matriarchal messages. Jerry Holt, Palm Beach Junior College. "Literary, Geographic, and Religious Allusions in The Goat Without Horns." Swann described The Goat Without Horns as "a tall tale with elements of Gothic parody." Here the book is considered Gothic, but not in the horror story sense. The sources for Swann's approach to the Gothic are examined. Robert A. Collins, Florida Atlantic University. "Love Is A Dragonfly." In poems, in an early, unpublished biography of Sappho, in short stories and in chapter headings, Swann worked and reworked this metaphor. Editors didn't like it, and usually changed it, but its ambience is central to Swann's viewpoint. THE ONCE AND FUTURE EDEN: THE FANTASY Room 112 IDEAL LANDSCAPE IN Chair: Joel N. Feimer, Mercy College, New York. Fay T. Greenwald, Mercy College. "The Urban Sublime: Images of New York City." With the emergence of the skyscraper as an indigenous American art came the popularity of photography. As the skyline of New York City evolved, photographs of the city helped the viewer to "read" the cityscape. In the literature of the the turn of the century the text often treated the indefinable city as both attractive and repellent. The blood-red city of man more and more came to be photographed as the white, shining City on the Hill. The luminosity and the new architectural form of New York City was seen as a mysterious "Manhattan sphinx." This paper will attempt to trace the growth of the rhetoric of the urban sublime. Howard Canaan, Mercy College. "Androgyny and the Paradisiacal Garden in Kafka's The Castle." Kafka's imaginative world of deserts, barren offices, and gray landscapes has been recognized as a wasteland, but implicit in Kafka's vision of desolation is a vision of a hidden paradise. As a case in point, The Castle contains such a locus amoenus buried beneath its snow-covered terrain. Not only a number of textual references to gardens, but the relationship of K. and Frieda and 21