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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 20
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 20. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/546.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 20. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/546

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 20, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/546.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_022.jpg
Transcript Friday, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PARALLEL UNIVERSE Room 118 Chair: Bud Ebote, Georgia Tech. Robert J. Ewald, Findlay College, Worlds of Clifford Simak." "The Alternate The motif of alternate worlds is predominant in many of the novels and short stories of Clifford Simak. These alternate worlds may be friendly or inimical. Simak uses alternate worlds as a device to explain time travel and to account for the future progress of mankind. The motif of alternate worlds has also provided Simak with a stylistic device to allow his unique blending of science fiction and fantasy genres in most of his works since 1965 (although his use of parallel universes extends back to the forties and the City series in Astounding) • Melissa E. Barth, Appalachian State University, North Carolina. "Seeing Parallels Where None Exist: Breaking Fantasy's Magical Spell." One species of parallel universe is the world of fantasy; and the establishment of an illusion of reality in that universe involves ground rules similar to those of science fiction parallel universes, but different in many ways from those of mainstream fiction (or even other science fiction). This paper inspects the principles involved in the "realism" of fantasy, using C.L. Moore's story "Jirel Meets Magic" as example. William M. Schuyler, University of Louisville. "Unnatural Laws." My paper begins with a discussion of the way philosophers have begun to talk about possible worlds and how this approach has been used to deal with the problem of truth in fiction: a statement about what happens in a fiction which is not true in our world may be said to be true if it is true in some suitable possible world. However, a case of special interest for fantasy and science fiction leads to difficult problems. FRIDAY, MARCH 25 2-3:30 P. 11. ITALIAN SCIENCE FICTION Room 100 Chair: Gaetano Cipolla, St. John's University, New York. Mario Mignone, SUNY at Stony Brook. "Dino Buzzati and Modern Italian Science Fiction." The multitude of science fiction books, conferences, and magazines to be found in Italy today testifies that Italian fantascienza is very much alive. Some writers have achieved literary distinction solely as writers of science fiction; others have taken the path of science fiction to strengthen their field of expression. In Larger Than Life, Buzzati's only true science fiction 20 novel and one of the best in Italy, while retaining the best qualities of his earlier works — the human concerns, the sense of mystery and the unknown — the author probes the theme of the stifling effects of technology on contemporary society and shows how destructive science and technology can be when capriciously applied. Gaetano Cipolla, St. John's University, New York. "Jung In Venice: Gasparini's "La Donna Immortale." Italian science fiction writers no longer write about giant insects infesting Texas: they have come home! Gasparini's tale is set in Venice. They have also projected their search inwardly, rather than to the stars, and there they find a reality older than time: the great mother. This paper will analyze the Jungian elements present in the novel. THE FANTASTIC IN THE WORKS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE I Room 102 Chair: Richard Kopley, Illinois State University. Jean Lorrah, Murray State University, Kentucky. "A Progression of Horror in Four Stories by Edgar Allan Poe." Perverseness causes the narrators of four Poe stories to commit seemingly incomprehensible murders. The four stories — "The Black Cat," "The Tell-Tale Heart," "The Imp of the Perverse," and "The Cask of Amontillado" — show a distinct progression in the narrators' attitudes from denial to acceptance, thus leading the reader into a confrontation with the horror of his own perverseness. Joseph Francavilla, SUNY/Buffalo. "Poe's Perversity and the Split Narrative 'I,' or How Not To Tell A Story." Poe's theory of perverseness, defined in "The Black Cat" as "the unfathomable longing of the soul to vex itself," and further developed in "The Imp of the Perverse," is a pervasive aesthetic device which effects a division within the first- person narrators in the above tales and in "The Tell-Tale Heart." Both in the form and in the content of these confessional stories the three traits of perversity can be detected: intentional circumlocution, procrastination, and self-annihilation. The narrators become torn between the desire to be brief and to be circumlocutory, to tell the story and not to tell the story. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV, The University of Mississippi. "Fantasy Figures in Poe's Poems." Figures, particularly female figures, abound in Poe's verse. Often they reveal much about the "voices" in the works when such poems are not, strictly, narratives. "Sonnet — To Science," "To Helen," and "To One in Paradise" may be considered representative. In the first, ambiguities increase when we consider ramifications of the fantasy- creation for "Science" being feminine. Just so, fantasy heightens in "To Helen," wherein the contemplation of tangible art work leads the speaker