Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 18
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 18. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 11, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/544.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 18. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/544

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 18, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 11, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/544.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 18
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_020.jpg
Transcript FRIDAY, 11 A.M. - 12:30 P.M. being? Is there an unchanging human reality (a soul perhaps) that constitutes the truth of human nature? The dilemma, often expressed in the imagery of deceptive containers which must be broken through or out of, comes to the fore in the first and final stories of the book: "Seeding Program" and "Watershed." The second and third stories — "The Thing in the Attic" and "Surface Tension" — reveal not only a parallel structure but the subtly pointed presence of a developing sexual analogy for the pantropy process, which does not so much reconcile the conflict between change and truth as it provides a flickering third term which, depending on how that term is taken, may be related to both change and truth. Michel Bailet, Acadia University, Padre Padrone." The Fantastic in Limiting myself to the etymological meaning of "fantastic" derived from the vulgar Latin "fantas- ticus" and the Greek "plantastikos" from "phan- tasia," imagination, I focus particularly on the working of a kind of retrospective imagination in Padre Padrone which allows the hero to "re-live" episodes from his past life. And yet with curious and self perpetrating circularity these very fantasies spring essentially from reality itself, but a reality which has already impregnated the subconscious. Michael Collings, Pepperdine University. "Artificial Languages in Science Fiction" Wittgenstein said, "The limits of my language mean the limits of my world." As science fiction moves farther from our world, the potentials of language must expand. Among 20th Century writers who explore the significance of language systems are C. S. Lewis, A. E. Van Vogt, Robert Heinlein, George Orwell, and most extensively Samuel R. Delany. But as early as 1668, John Wilkins of the Royal Society devised an artificial language in which the symbols were directly related to the meanings they carried. It could be seen as a prototypical "Babel-17," though it was too unwieldy even for its inventor. FANTASTIC IN ITALIAN LITERATURE, II Room 106 Chair: Mario B. Mignone, State University of New York at Stony Brook. Thomas E. Vesce, Mercy Collate. "Fantastic Encounters in Early Italian Literature." Early Italian folk-legends and songs of chivalry often served to express the stages of individual development and the classic need to fantasize one's role in society. This paper tests this premise by means of a review of the works of Antonio Pucci, Andrea da Barberino and one or two other anonymous cantari from the Trecento- Quattrocento period. a Vera F. Golini, St. Jerome's College. "Fact and Fantasy in the Decameron." Eminent critics of Boccaccio (Bruno Maier among them) have repeatedly called attention to the paramount role which the element of "realism" plays in the whole of the Decameron. "Realism," however exists as a firm basis for the fantastic medieval machinations and imagination of the writer. In some of the tales whose very internal progression and, indeed, existence depend primarily on fortuitous, quite improbable occurrences, the element of realism is second in importance to that unique sense of the fantastic which has been so appreciated in Boccaccio, but has not yet been sufficiently studied. LATIN AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY FICTION: FANTASY AND THE WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE ROOM 108 Chair: Patricia University. A. Pardinas-Barnes, Georgetown Michael Capobianco, St. Johns University. "Quantum Theory, Spacetime, and Borges' Bifurcations." An analysis of Borges' story, "The Garden of the Forking Paths," is presented using a space-time diagram, a device of modern physics. The relationship between the structure of this story and one of the contemporary interpretations of quantum theory is discussed. It seems that Borges anticipated a viable scientific viewpoint in this "fic- cion. ii Eugene Maio, University of Akron. "German Expressionism and Hispanic Magical Realism." Not only did the new Spanish American narrative take its name, Magischer Realismus, from German Expressionist painting, but Hispanic fiction also shares with Expressionism a new aproach to reality. A comparison of some paintings by Kandinsky, Nolde, Klee, Marc and Macke with the fiction of Borges, Carpentier, Cortazar, Rulfo, and Garcia Marquez reveals that both artistic groups strive to generate an emotional state of being through the creative use of the unconscious, the fantastic, the mythic, and the cosmic. Both painter and writer reach for intuitions of a magical or unreal reality. These artists tell us that how we formulate the environment becomes the environment itself. Nature or objective reality is no longer a reliable referent for human creativity. Ambiguity and enigma become acceptable dimensions of reality. Joseph Tyler, West Georgia College. "'Chac Mool': A Journey Into the Fantastic." Carlos Fuentes' short story "Chac Mool" owes much to earlier literature of the fantastic, in general and in particular. The narrator even quotes Borges, and the line quoted supports the edifice of the fantastic in the story. Thus Fuentes' affinity with other writers in this genre can be seen not only as allusion and parallel but also as illuminating the story itself. i 18