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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 17
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 17. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/543.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 17. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/543

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 17, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/543.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 17
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_019.jpg
Transcript FRIDAY, 11 A.M. - 12:>0 P.M. n c a f c e Russ's We Who Are About To brings a feminist perspective to the Crusoe-like survival story. Angela Carter's Heroes and Villains depicts a post-apocalyptic world in which a civilized woman proves stronger than male barbarians. Thomas Berger's Regiment of Women presents a dystopian society in which sex roles have been completely reversed. These novelists suggest the need for transitional formulas that respond to the needs of a culture whose stereotypes are in flux. Patricia Frazer Lamb and Diana Veith, Westminster College. "Again, The Left Hand of Darkness: Androgyny or Homophobia?" In Ursula LeGuin's The Left Hand of Darkness the male, human narrator, Genii Ai, and the Gethenian, Estraven, never consummate their mutual love, ostensible because they are involved in a hazardous journey and their very survival would be jeopardized by any expression of sexuality. A more important motive, however, is that a sexual relationship would undermine LeGuin's portrayal of Gethenian androgyny in giving Estraven a biologically passive, subordinate role. Yet another motive, contrarily, is that the relationship Genii and Estraven establish during their terrible journey is more reminiscent of an asexual male-bond — psychologically making theirs a homosexual, "forbidden" love that cannot be fulfilled. Lillian M. Heldreth, Northern Michigan University. "Speculations on Heterosexual Equality: Was It in the Beginning, or Shall It Ever Be?" Authors such as Vonda Mclntyre have successfully portrayed women as active "heroes," in control of their sexuality and their destiny. Others cannot get away from an ideal of male domination even in stories of female warriors, or have tried looking backward to a golden age of woman-dominated goddess-worship which may never have existed. O/er a period of time the works of some authors, like Marion Zimmer Bradley and Anne McCaffrey, reveal tremendous growth in their ability to imagine women in positive roles. Perhaps Ursula K. LeGuin is the most successful at imagining situations in which equality might actually work. And yet the possibility still exists that James Tiptree, Jr., is right in holding that equality is as impossible as nonviolence for society as a whole. FRIDAY, MARCH 2 5 1 1 A. M. - 1 2 : 3 0 P. M. d f s D a ANIMALS AND SOCIAL SATIRE II Room 100 Chair: Christa-Maria Beardsley, Indiana University at South Bend. Hallam Walker, Davidson College, North Carolina. No abstract available. Michele K. Langford, Pepperdine University, California. While apparently pursuing a tradition when he writes his Natural History, Felix Labisse renews totally this literary "lieu commun." The beasts that he identif ies,classifies, and describes are not to be found in the real world but spring forth from the depths of his imagination. As an artist and poet Labisse gives consistency to the creatures that dwell in his secret world. He does so, however, with great humor, and irony becomes the incisive tool with which he carves portraits of his contemporaries, turning at times the sharp point toward himself. Joseph J. Marchesani, Pennsylvania State University. "Conditionally Satire: Walter M. Miller, Jr.'s Moral Technology." Although Walter M. Miller, Jr., is not usually regarded as a satirist, at least one of his works, "Conditionally Human," may be appreciated more fully if it is considered as a satire. In examining the work, this paper raises three questions: (1) What is the subject of its satire? (2) What practices does its satire exaggerate or invert in order to transform our perception? (3) What shared value does its satire affirm? In answering these questions, the paper asserts that "Conditionally Human" envisions a constrained technology and a regressive humanity whose sense of purpose in any larger moral scheme has been lost. Miller's strategy for satirizing this predicament envisions a race of artificially enhanced chimpanzees, called "neutroids," who are morally legitimized through references to a Biblical order of creation and redemption. SCIENCE FICTION: THE NEW HUMANISM Room 102 Chair: Michael H. Palmer, Louisburg College. Mark Siegel, university of Wyoming. "Science Fiction as Interdiscipline." Even though literature teachers have been slow to embrace science fiction as humanistic literature that might help to bridge the growing gap between humanists and scientists, few artistic genres can claim to be more broadly concerned with human beings and their values, capacities, and achievements than science fiction. This paper describes a course, "Science Fiction and Science," developed after the author's participation in an NEH-spon- sored program called Creating Connections. With more universities every year adopting general education requirements to stress interdisciplinary learning and with the increasing understanding that true humanism implies a much broader field of knowledge than has often been allowed in the past, courses like "Science Fiction and Science" may assume a more central place in the curriculum. David Ketterer, Concordia University. "Change, Truth, and Sex in The Seedling Stars by James Blish." The Seedling Stars is the most important of three books that Blish wrote concerned with genetic engineering. In this four-story sequence the particular technique — one designed to fit human beings to alien worlds — is called "pantropy" which means "changing everything." But the question arises, if everything about a human being is, or can be, changed, is the result still a human 17