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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 16
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 16. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/542.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 16. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/542

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 16, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/542.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 16
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_018.jpg
Transcript Friday, 9 - 10:30 a.m. 1 texts provide vary: ten say "no"; six say "yes." The purpose of a Supreme Being in Herbert's fiction is to pull man back from destruction in order that he be able to continue to adapt, modify, and evolve. The transformations wrought are genetic; and, ironically, the man in whose image the god is created is pushed, by the god, into an image that does not mirror the god. What is important in such texts as the Dune series is the concept of an evolutionary dynamic of a "Pattern." Peter W. Macky, Westminster College. "Religion in C.S. Lewis' Till We Have Faces." Till We Have Faces is the only one of C.S. Lewis' novels in which there is substantial, overt description and criticism of human religious beliefs and practices. In this novel, religion is ambiguous, standing in fruitful tension with rationalism which is represented by the Fox who is described as a Greek. The most interesting characteristic of the ancient religion depicted is that it is to a certain extent shown as both a true representation of divine reality and a destructive institution. Implicit in Lewis' novel is criticism of both extremes: irrational fundamentalism and rationalist modernism. Judith J. Kollmann, University of Michigan at Flint. "The Tarot at Christmas Time: Charles Williams' The Greater Trumps." As all Charles Williams' novels do, The Greater Trumps deals with occult phenomena — in this case, with the ability of the Tarot pack to predict the future. Williams' promise is that, if the pack can be used for clairvoyant purposes, then in some way it is connected to the supernatural forces of the universe; and, because he was a Christian, to Williams the Tarot becomes a tool of God. Further, the tarot pack in the novel is the archetypal deck, the first to be created; as such, it has special properties: not only does it fore-tell the future, but it also can bring about magical .transformations. Used during the Christmas season, | those cards result in the birth of a new Messiah. THE EVOLUTION OF FANTASTIC ANIMALS: THREE SLIDE LECTURES Room 112 Chair: Joan Digby, C.W. Post College, L.I.U. Vernie M. Logan, Baylor University. "The Dragon as Evolving Artistic Invention." The dragon as a symbol of fear is an expression of western man's fear that reaches back into prehistory. Changing an abstract concept into a figurative image, artists progressively rendered the dragon with increasing realism. As it proceeds from abstraction to figuration, the dragon follows an evolutionary pattern uncannily Darwinian. First reptilian, it became increasingly mammalian then anthropomorphic. It was the artist who excercised selectivity according to cultural inclinations and adapted the dragon to meet cultural demands. Michael Hancher, University of Minnesota. "The Descent 16 of Jabberwock." John Tenniel's well-known drawing of the Jabberwock for Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass descends from several traditions of monstrous illustration: a contemporary cartoon by George Du Maurier, which satirizes both Victorian paleontology and "educational" children's literature (the dream of reason begets monsters); Tenniel's own obsessive reproduction of St. George's dragon, in drawings for Punch; and a hideous monster painted by Salvatore Rosa, which fascinated Carroll's colleague John Ruskin, against his better judgment. Casey Fredericks, Indiana University. "The Evolution of Big Bugs in Science Fiction." With an emphasis on the evolutionary development of science fiction's "Big Bugs," the lecture will contrast several ways of envisioning fantastic insects: (1) the Frankensteinian tradition of fearing giant, mutant bugs; bugs able to compete with humans for the mastery of the planet and extinction of the enemy species in a Darwinian survival of the fittest; (2) a satirical, cognitive, and sympathetic attitude evident in a "menippean" tradition which includes Lucan, L. Frank Baum, Lewis Carroll, and Stefan Themerson; (3) the existential theme of man-as-bug: The Metamorphosis, The Fly, The Incredible Shrinking Man; miniaturization of man vs. enlargement of bugs. FANTASTIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE Room 116 Chair: Eton Curl, Florida Atlantic University. Jeffrey J. Bayer, The University of Alabama — Huntsville. "Ave Maria Grotto: Architecture or Fantasy." This illustrated presentation will describe Brother Joseph's work and explore such issues as: the relation of the "models" to the actual buildings; the sense of realism in relation to the fantastic nature of the creations; the characteristics of a "folk art environment"; the role and nature of fantasy as an element of a folk art environment. William Melczer, Syracuse University."The Fantastic and the Iconography of Black Magic in the Late Renaissance." This is a slide lecture on the subject of witches, imps, devils, and magic images in the Renaissance. SEXUALITY IN FANTASTIC LITERATURE: FEMINIST VIEWS Room 118 Chair: Donald Palumbo, Northern Michigan University. Brooks Landon, The University of Iowa. "Sexuality and the Reversal of Expectations in the Fiction of Russ, Carter, and Berger." A growing number of works present an "anti-formula" in depicting favorably unexpected sexual roles — roles that not only differ from, but that also directly challenge, culture stereotyping. Joanna ♦•