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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 15
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 15. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/541.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 15. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/541

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 15, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/541.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_017.jpg
Transcript FRIDAY, 9 - 10:30 A.M. trol others and be the center of confirming attention. Essentially a family story, Metamorphosis provides a fantastic depiction of a man who is destroyed by the emotionally invalidating responses of his family. St. George Tucker Arnold,Jr., Florida International University. "Don Marquis, archy and mehitabel, and the Triumph of Comic Vitality: Cats and Cockroaches on the Darkling Plain." Don Marquis' archy and mehitabel stories contrast less distinctive light verse by the way the imaginative vitality of roach and cat transcends the depression, terror that would be more reasonable responses to the lethal back-alley underworld they inhabit. They strugle not solely to survive, but to maintain dignifying elements of their roach and cat personalities; archy must keep his poet's soul alive, rage at Fate for demotion from human to vermin, criticize humanity for hypocrisy, and even plot cosmic revenge for his lot. Mehitabel asserts her always-a-lady-in-spite-of-hell sense of herself, disregarding damage to ego and skeletal system. Both transform harsh experience to poetry: poetry of romantic adventure, of Rabelaisian self-celebration, of cosmic, even infernal adventure. THE FANTASTIC AND LATIN AMERICAN WRITERS Room 102 Chair: Nora Orthmann, University of Miami. Kathleen M. Glenn, Wake Forest University. "Reflections on the Writing of a Fantastic Narrative." In recent years a number of Spanish writers have, as it were, invited us into their workshop and have permitted us to observe the conception or elaboration of literary texts. Jose Maria Merino's Novela de Andres Choz (1976) is of particular interest because it dramatizes the writing of a fantastic novel. Merino's protagonist, Choz, is engaged in the process of composing a fantastic narrative, and in a series of letters to a friend he discusses the problems he encounters in trying to give form to his ideas. (His observations are doubly self-reflexive inasmuch as they faithfully mirror the problems Merino faced.) Thus we see a writer writing, reading, and reflecting on the genre of the fantastic. Gloria S. Melendez, Brigham Young University. "Reincarnation and Metempsychosis in Am ado Nervo's Fantasy." Among the Mexican poet Arnado Nervo's prolific writings are some forty short stories and essay- stories in addition to six "nouvelles" that can be called "fantastic" or that deal with the "strange." Two of these short novels and three of the short stories deal with reincarnation and metempsychosis. These works reflect Nervo's constant preoccupation in his search for the secrets of life through various religions and philosophies, as well as reveal his relatively little known narrative skill. FANTASTIC IN ITALIAN LITERATURE I Room 106 Chair: Mario B. Mignone, State University of New York at Stony Brook. Florinda Iannace, Fordham University. "The Ideal Woman and Fantasy in Dante, Petrarca and Boccaccio." This paper explores how Beatrice, Laura, and Fiammetta represent the feminine ideal of the three great poets as well as one of the best fruits of their fantasy and imagination. Each author has created and fashioned woman according to his ideal, expanding on his creation during all his poetic life trying to bring her to completion and to perfection. Emanuel L. Paparella, University of Puerto Rico. "Vico's Fantasia as the Origins of Modern Hermeneutics." Modern hermeneutics has its origins in a general theory of linguistic understanding whose precursors are usually thought to be Schleiermacher and Dilthey in the 19th Century and Heidegger and Gadamer in the 20th Century. Already in the 18th Century, Giambattista Vico had shown in his New Science (1730) that the encounter with a literary work of art is always intrinsically historical and linguistic. For Vico the very origins of the human world are intimately connected to the origins of language; what he called "poetic wisdom." Within this imaginative activity (Fantasia), myth is of utmost importance. Indeed Vico is the first theoretician of language to point out the essential function of myth for the proper understanding and interpretation of humanistic disciplines. Vincenzo Bollettino, Montclair State College. "The Nature of the Fantastic in the Novels of Carlo Levi and Garcia Marquez." In Carlo Levi's "Gagliano" and Gabriel Garcia Marquez' "Macondo" there is no way to tell truth from rumor, history from fantasy. In "Macondo" and "Gagliano" there are many marvels which have nothing to do with our commonplace scientific world at all; nature does not function there with the regularity or impartiality it shows elsewhere, and time, if it moves at all, moves in circles. "Gagliano" and "Macondo" are lost worlds, anachronistic societies at once real and magical, grotesque and fantastic, amusing and tragic to the sophisticated eye. To both writers, the fantastic is often inseparable from what is realistically cruel and bizarre. RELIGION AND TWENTIETH CENTURY FANTASY Room 108 Chair: Melissa E. Barth, Appalachian State University. David M. Miller, Purdue University. "Frank Herbert's Gods." The novels of Frank Herbert raise the question, "Is there a Supreme Being who is qualitatively different from man?" The answers the different 15