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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 14
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 14. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/540.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 14. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/540

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 14, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/540.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_016.jpg
Transcript THURSDAY, 4 - 5:^0 P.M. Most importantly, the. locket becomes a golden circumference containing a point which will enable the hero to achieve his potentiality. Nodier's circles lead us to a centering point symbolic of spiritual dilation or a palingenetic leap forward to the infinite. Andree Thorns, Memorial University of Newfoundland. "The Language of Geometry in the Work of Alain Robbe-Grillet." Modern art ideology sees geometric form as the basis of perception and the artist as a man compelled to analyze forms in terms of relationship and tension. Alain Robbe-Grillet, in the footsteps of the many modern artists who have entered this age of reasoned and conscious creation, weaves a new literary textile on a warp of geometric language. In his constructional work the geometric symbol becomes alive, bears its own significance, and speaks a language which delights the.intellect. Not only does it reveal the structural foundation of Robbe-Grillet's Nouveau Roman but also serves to express the author's phenomeno- logical perception of reality and fantasy. Tom Brown, Brigham Young University. "The Notion of Mirror and its Effect in Sartre's No Exit. Imagine a situation with eternal seeing of others and not self. This is the case with Garcin, Ines and Estelle in Sartre's play, No Exit. Seeing is ever-present because there is no darkness, and the eyes canno't close because the three have no eyelids. How then will the characters know who they are or what they look like? Without the usual reassurance of reflections of self in a mirror, these three lost ones may begin to doubt their own existence. There is a way out. The self may be reflected in the description of the others, but there is a terrible risk. What if the others falsify? What if the image is blurred or altered? How will one ever know? OCCULT AND SACRED Room 116 Chair: Richard Hersh, Florida Atlantic University. Martin Schwarz, East Carolina University. "The Occult as Indicator of the Times: The Exorcist and The Dybbuk." No abstract available. Robert F. Geary, James Madison University. "Gothic Shockers New and Old: Supernatural Horrors and Cultural Secularization." Much critical discussion treats today's enormously popular fiction of supernatural horror as a holdover from the "childhood of the race," something bound to vanish in a modern, rational, secularized world. Yet such fiction's popularity suggests the inadequacy of the critical paradigm of an age of profane consciousness. Modern secularization is a most complex process which, by weakening tradional beliefs, actually proves conducive to the free-floating numinous terror of the modern Gothics. Indeed, a frequent theme in 14 the Victorian ghost stories and today's shockers is the shallowness of the rationalistic mindset which smugly (and to its peril) dismisses the supernatural (and supernatural fiction). FRIDAY, MARCH 25 9-10:30 A. M. ANIMALS AND SOCIAL SATIRE I Room 100 Chair: Christa-Maria Beardsley, Indiana University at South Bend. Gisela Vitt-Maucher, The Ohio State University. "E.T.A. Hoffmann: From Cat To Flea." Humanoid animals feature in many of Hoffmann's works. In his peculiar double-novel Life and Opinions of the Tomcat Murr the cat is conceived as the philistine counterpart to the "other" hero, the talented and tormented artist Kreisler. Immersed in self-idolatry Murr abounds in the mannerisms and vices of the bourgeois whom Hoffmann despises. In Master Flea the socially embarrassing flea represents positive qualities which Hoffmann finds lacking in human society: he is the Master of a republican nation with an indomitable drive for freedom and equality. But the flea's desire for freedom extends into the erotic realm as well, creating surrealistically fantastic scenes of outrageous humor. George Reinhardt, University of Connecticut, Storrs. "Swiss Animal Satire as Psychological Safety Valve." Its unparalleled prosperity has exacted a toll from Switzerland's citizens. The premium placed on pragmatism leads to an insistence on thrift and conformity inimical to outpourings of the irrational. For those Swiss who feel penned in but choose to remain at home, artistic creation can offer a kind of psychological safety valve. An examination of animal symbols in works ranging in time from the drawings of the sixteenth-century Urs Graf to the theatre of Durrenmatt and contemporary children's literature illustrates both the release of the imagination and a trend towards increasing emphasis on didacticism and more rigid control of the fantastic. J. Brooks Bouson, Mundelein College, Illinois. "The Repressed Grandiosity of Gregor Samsa: Narcissism in Kafka's Metamorphosis." Reading Metamorphosis in a new context — that provided by Heinz Kohut in his pioneering studies in the narcissistic personality disorder — provides a new insight not only into the underlying cause and meaning of Gregor's transformation, but also the core of his predicament. In the character of Gregor Samsa, Kafka depicts Kohut's "Tragic Man," the narcissistically vulnerable individual suffering from a crumbling, threatened sense of self. Gregor's transformation reveals at once his sense of worthlessness and powerlessness to con-