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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 13
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 13. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/539.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 13. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/539

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 13, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/539.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_015.jpg
Transcript THURSDAY, 4 - 5:i0 P.M. THURSDAY, MARCH 24 4-5:30 P. M. ASPECTS OF THE FANTASTIC IN THE THEATRE OF THE ABSURD AND THE FRENCH SHORT STORY Room 100 Chair: Jean-Pierre Lalande, Moravian College, Pennsylvania. Sylvie Pantalacci, Colgate University, New York. "A Fantasy Where Art Quickens the World of Love and Death." This analysis deals with two nineteenth century short stories ("The Venus of Ille" by Prosper Merimee, and "Omphale" by Theophile Gautier), in which an art form comes to life. Are there any hints of modern attitudes in these texts? Michael H. Palmer, Louisburg College, North Carolina. "The Use of the Double in Beckett's Waiting for Godot and Other Plays." In several of his plays, especially Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett fulfills in his characters the definition by C.F. Keppler of the double, or second self: the imaginative creature, that shadowed self responsible for the dynamic tension between selves, the self that intrudes upon the first and establishes a relationship in close affinity that neither desires nor understands. Beckett's Vladimir/Estragon, Pozzo/Lucky, Hamm/ Clov, Nagg/Nell, Winnie/Willie, and Krapp/earlier selves are clever and artistic uses of the double used to explore the cruel and inexplicable nature of human existence. Jean-Pierre Lalande, Moravian College. " The Fantastic and the Absurd in Ionesco's Theatre." In Ionesco's theatre, we are often confronted with a fantastic situation where matter suddenly seems to come to life and invade everything. We shall examine a few plays where this phenomenon occurs and see how such a fantastic device symbolizes an alienating force insofar as it crushes man, deprives him of his freedom of action, and isolates him from his peers. BLAKE AND FROST: RECONCILING OPPOSITIONS Room 102 Chair: Michael Collings, Pepperdine University, and Bertha Keveson Hertz, St. Hyacinth College & Seminary, Massachusetts. Whitlark, Texas Tech University. "Divided Mind in Blake: Songs of Innocence and of Experience." The typically complex relationship between text and picture in illustrated fantastic poetry may involve contradiction between the two hemispheres of the human brain: the left dealing with logic, language systems, and time; the right controlling spatial perception and analogy, with little if any sense of the temporal. In Blake's Songs the illu strations are generally closer to the Eternal (and thus for Blake truer) perspective than the literal reading of the text. But the poems' ambiguities, which shatter ordinary logic and temporal sequence, bridge the separation between timeless and temporal. A. J. Montesi, St. Louis University. "Fantasy and the Terror Image in the Poetry of Robert Frost." Too often, Frost has been labeled the sunny poet who provides us with positive affirmations of our role as earthlings and Americans in our own and future times. But Frost has his own gallery of misshaped men, a whole closet of ghosts, and a sizable kettle of psychological horrors. If we look closely enough we can see that Frost makes of his map of New England a Gothic waste as foreboding as any in Poe or Mary Shelley. By balancing these repugnant items with positive ones he produces the bite and piquancy that makes his poetry some of the best of its time. LITERATURE OF SUBVERSION II: THE FANTASTIC AND THE FAIRY TALE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY Room 106 Chair: Gary K. Wolfe, Roosevelt University. Bernadette Bosky, Duke University. "'What Was It?' and 'The Damned Thing': Invisibility and Epistemology." Two tales by Fitz-James O'Brien and Ambrose Bierce on the theme of the invisible adversary make for an excellent comparison because of similar subject matter and differing literary and philosophical approaches, particularly when viewed in terms of Todorov's distinction between the uncanny and the marvelous. "Oscar Wilde's Jack Zipes, University of Wisconsin, Socialist Fairy Tales." Abstract not available. Jules Zanger, Southern Illinois University. "The Fairy Tale as Captivity Narrative." Abstract not available. REFLECTIONS AND REFRACTIONS: GEOMETRY AND MIRRORS IN LITERATURE OF THE FANTASTIC Room 108 Chair: Virginia Harger-Grinling, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. Grant Crichfield, University of Vermont. "Full Circle(s) in Nodier's La Fee Aux Miettes." In La Fee aux Miettes, narrative, temporal and spatial structures; metaphor and symbol; even the philosophical and mythic underpinnings are circular in nature and serve as a prefiguration at every level of the unity and ulterior existence for which the tale's central character strives. Further, frequent allusions to circular movements and objects punctuate the text at every turn. 13