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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 11
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 11. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/537.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 11. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/537

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 11, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/537.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_013.jpg
Transcript THURSDAY, 2 - 5:$Q P.M. PSYCHOBIOGRAPHICAL APPROACHES TO THE FANTASTIC Room 102 Chair: Alan C. Elms, Harvard University. Phyllis Roth, Skidmore College, New York. "Some Uses of Psychobiographical Approaches to Fantasy: The Cases of Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker, Vladimir Nabokov." The significance of psychobiography in literary studies will be sketched by reference to Frankenstein, Dracula and Ada. These examples demonstrate that psychobiography can provide both rereadings of texts, otherwise seemingly unavailable, and an entree to reader response. On the former point, I will discuss what happens to readings of Frankenstein when one takes into account the death of Mary Shelley's mother at Shelley's birth, and the deaths of Shelley's children; rereadings of Dracula in light of Stoker's obsessive ambivalence toward women; and Nabokov's employment of fiction to control the patterns of a world and a life. On the latter point, I will suggest ways in which a psychobiographical approach may provide a bridge between authors' management of fantasies and readers' responses. Alan C. Elms, Harvard University. "The Creation of Cordwainer Smith." A work of artistic fantasy may serve one or more psychological functions for its creator. It may simply express aspects of the artist's personality. It may be used defensively to control unacceptable impulses or to ease the pain of unresolved intrapsychic conflicts. Or it may function restitutively as the artist overcomes and moves beyond such conflicts. Paul Linebarger's fiction appears to have served the latter function for him, assisted by psychotherapeutic treatment. Evidence for his psychological development will be examined in his realistic mainstream novels and in the science fiction stories he wrote under the pseudonym of Cordwainer smith. LITERATURE OF SUBVERSION Is THE FANTASTIC AND THE FAIRY TALE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY Room 106 Chair: Gary K. Wolfe, Roosevelt University. John Wenke, Marquette University. "Melville's Mardi: The Fabulous as Psychological and Political Corrective." In his "Preface" to Mardi, Melville responds to incredulous criticism of his earlier travel books by proclaiming his intention to publish a work of fabulation and romance. Sustaining his narrative by means of intellectual preoccupations and a copious display of invention, Melville employs the genre of the fantastic to construct symbolic projections of imbalances within self and state. Catherine McClenahan, Marquette University. "Uses of the Fantastic: England 1790-1850." By the second half of the eighteenth century, the fantastic is being used to escape from or criticize the deficiencies of the existing order of things. Among the Romantic poets, Blake makes the most radical use of the fantastic, undermining the division of "phantasy" and "reality" and exploring the relations between imagination and desire. In the mainstreams of both poetry and the novel, however, the fantastic tends toward what Blake would call "spectrous" rather than fully creative imagination: nostalgia (for the ancient or medieval past) or anxiety (the gothic). Even so, the fantastic's growing influence allows wider access to the writing of literature and articulates a wide variety of discontents. Gary K. Wolfe, Roosevelt University. "The Romantic Fairy Tale and Modern Fantasy." The development of the literary adult fairy tale in the early nineteenth century, especially in Germany, gave rise to many of the conventions and attitudes that have since entered modern fantasy by way of the Victorians. Both in terms of narrative technique and psychological concerns, such authors as Tieck, Novalis, and Hoffmann exerted a significant influence on the generation of fantastic writers which was to follow in England. REALITY VERSUS FANTASIA IN CALVTNO Room 108 Chair: Constance Markey, Loyola University, Chicago. Kathryn Hume, Pennsylvania State University. "Man, Fantasy, and Reality in Calvino's Cosmicomical Stories." Calvino creates new "myths" that assert a bearable relationship between man and the universe without having to build from unscientific premises. Through his myths' redundancies, their characteristic binary oppositions, and their mediations, Calvino describes ways man can establish a sense of meaning: attraction, antagonism, creativity, and vision. Transformation and novelty are the values that permit his myths to handle questions of death, meaning, apocalypse. Fantasy also ornaments and illustrates his argument that we must augment scientific cause-and-effect thinking with associative, metaphoric thinking. Science turns us out from ourselves toward reality; fantsy helps us to integrate ourselves with what we see. Carolyn Springer, Rutgers University. "The Favola Moderna of Marcovaldo." Calvino's portrait of Marcovaldo, the simple worker from the provinces who has immigrated to the modern industrial city, has less in common with postwar neorealism than with Calvino's own peculair favolistic style, alternating close description, characterization, and narrative with the hyperbolic, hallucinatory, and absurd. This paper examines the mixture of styles which characterize the "favola moderna" of Marcovaldo, making it in Calvino's own words a "divagazione comico- melanconica in margine al neorealismo." Anca Vlasopolos, Wayne State University. "Love and the Fantastic in Calvino." Calvino's universe in Cosmicomics is subject to laws of expansion and retraction that are governed 11