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Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Page 10
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International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 10. March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/536.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. (March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983). Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 10. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/536

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program - Page 10, March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/564/show/536.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, Program
Creator (LCNAF)
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Date March 24, 1983 - March 27, 1983
Description Program book for the Fourth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.
Donor Leiber, Fritz; Leiber, Justin
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction conventions
  • Fantasy fiction
  • Science fiction
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz
  • Wolfe, Gene
  • Wilhelm, Kate
  • Pohl, Frederik
  • Knight, Damon
  • Gunn, James E.
  • International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boca Raton, Florida
Genre (AAT)
  • brochures
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/5287
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f015_042_012.jpg
Transcript ^Se SB £5w*i £ A OT7 EBc r ©o THURSDAY, MARCH 24 2-3:30 P. M. FANTASTIC SPIES Room 100 Chair: Helen S. Gar son, George Mason University. Amelia A. Rutledge, George Mason University. "Science Fiction Spies from E.E. Smith to Stanislaw Lem." Science fiction, like "mainstream" fiction, tends to appropriate the conventions of related sub- genres. Thus, the special agent, the duplicitous bureaucracy, and other characteristics of the traditional spy story or "thriller" have been used in modern science fiction with some frequency. The essentially fantastic nature of science fiction means that these stories tend toward the "thriller" as a model, with the more reflective story (of Le Carre or Graham Greene) occurring less frequently. Using examples from the science fiction of E.E. Smith, James H. Schmitz, Philip K. Dick, and Stanislaw Lem, this study examines how the above-named writers have employed and adapted the conventions of the more traditional spy-narrative. Joseph Sanders, Lakeland Community College, Ohio. "The Fantastic Non-Fantastic: Richard Condon's Waking Nightmares." Today, a new kind of borderline science fiction/ secret agent novel reflects the public's distraught alienation. The novels of Richard Condon show how the conventional genre of espionage fiction can be stretched toward the fantastic, as maneuvers become so extreme that they threaten to disturb the basic structure of political and social reality — and as they express a human tendency toward perverse distortion that seeks to impose its "reality" on the world. The secret agents perform deeds that resemble science fiction and fantasy, but even more disturbing is the way they act in the service of private, irrational fantasies. The popularity of such works shows public uncertainty concerning official "truth." Helen S. Garson, George Mason University. "Fantasy, Excess, and James Bond." For every reader, Ian Fleming's novels provide fantasy, since the only realities of the books are in actual places and familiar objects. The same story, however, provokes widely divergent responses, for the distortion within the text may be used to support numerous theories. Such is the fantasy that subsists in the characters and exploits in the 007 stories that they may be interpreted from a feminist, or psychoanalytic, or mythical, or Christian, or anti-Christian view. Is Bond the sadistic "other," the fulfillment of repressed longing, the quest hero, the twentieth century's St. George, or the devil incarnate? 10